TEACHERS: Get free access to all Lessons and Current Events

Learn More

Japanese knotweeds strange superpowers
Science

Japanese Knotweed's Invasive Superpowers

Even beautiful plants can sometimes be detrimental to the environment. This public radio story takes place in Michigan where the sale of Japanese knotweed has been outlawed following unchecked growth of the large ornamental plant. Japanese knotweed is fast-growing, aggressive and hard to control. It can destroy pavement and even houses and it is unlikely to be eradicated any time soon.

Read More
Jeffersons gardens
Science

Jefferson's Gardens Display a Diverse Ecosystem

Thomas Jefferson’s vegetable garden at Monticello contains over 300 varieties of more than 90 different plants, demonstrating the diversity of Earth’s ecosystem. The former President and founding father prided himself on his diversified and rare collection of plants. And he never failed to record his gardening achievements in his famed “garden book”. Listen to learn more about the history of Jefferson’s garden and it’s current state following restoration.

Read More
3902752909 94634601bb b
ELA

Jhumpa Lahiri’s American Identity

Children of immigrants can often feel like they’re never completely accepted either in their adopted home country or their parents’ country of origin. The author Jhumpa Lahiri was born to Indian parents in London and raised in Rhode Island. She is an author of many books, including "The Namesake" and "The Interpreter of Maladies." But she says she’s struggled to feel like she belonged in America. Mixed feelings about identity form a central theme in her work. Listen to hear how Jhumpa Lahiri has dealt with the difficulties of immigration and the struggles of tradition and how these themes have influenced her writing.

Read More
John irving by kubik 01
ELA • ELL

John Irving Inspired by Dickens

When American author John Irving was 14 years old, he read "Great Expectations," by Charles Dickens and it changed his life forever. That book played a pivotal role in shaping Irving’s success as a writer. Now the author of more than a dozen narratives and an Academy Award-winning screenwriter, Irving continues to base his works on similar themes and ideas found throughout the novels of his literary mentor. Listen to the audio story as Irving explains the ways that Dickens impacted his accomplishments and which one book remains for Irving to read when he can no longer write.

Read More
Truth in nonfiction
ELA

Jon Krakauer on Researching 'Into the Wild'

The book "Into the Wild" chronicled the journey of twenty-four year old Christopher McCandless who died in April of 1992 after attempting to survive alone and virtually unaided on a remote Alaskan hiking trail. While McCandless’ official cause of death has been recorded as starvation, author Jon Krakauer has evidence suggesting otherwise. Krakauer, who wrote "Into the Wild," has conducted extensive research on McCandless’ death even after he first published the book chronicling McCandless’ experiences. His findings have led him to believe that McCandless’ death may have been caused by the ingestion of a poisonous potato seed that is only deadly if you are malnourished. Listen to hear what evidence led Krakauer to this conclusion.

Read More
Joyce carol oates
ELA

Joyce Carol Oates’ Life Shaped Her Writings

Writer Joyce Carol Oates is the successful author of more than 50 novels and even more works of non-fiction, poetry, plays and short stories. Her writing, known for its high quality, is filled with ideas, themes and subjects across multiple genres. Many readers and fans of her work are aware of the violent, dark nature of some of her stories, but may not realize that many of these themes are based on events she experienced in her early years. Oates shares these stories in her recent memoir, “The Lost Landscape.” Listen to hear Oates explore how her early life shaped her not only as a person, but as a writer.

Read More
Julia alvarez
ELA

Julia Alvarez and Haiti

Julia Alvarez is a Dominican-American poet, novelist, and essayist. Her novels include “How the García Girls Lost Their Accents” and “In the Time of the Butterflies.“ Growing up in the Dominican Republic, she learned about the massacre of over 20,000 Haitians living in the Dominican Republic in 1937. She was consistently presented with negative stereotypes of her Haitian neighbors. For these reasons, Alvarez felt too ashamed and even afraid to visit Haiti. But she made the trip to attend a wedding after the 2010 earthquake. Listen to learn more about how Alvarez needed to cross many borders—internal, historical, cultural—that stood in her way.

Read More
Killer whales
Science

Killer Whales Echolocate Loudly

Have you ever heard a killer whale? Biologists studying killer whales face the challenge of studying organisms that spend a majority of their time underwater. This public radio story goes underwater to hear what whales sound like and looks at the reasons scientists are willing to work so hard to study them. In addition, the story explores the adaptations that different populations of killer whales have evolved to capture prey.

Read More
7331119710 40435e6b10 k
Science

Learning to Garden and Cook in School

Many schools now have gardens where students grow and harvest food that they cook themselves in class. The “Let's Move Initiative,” a program created by former First Lady Michelle Obama in 2010, has generated awareness about school gardens and teaching cooking skills that enable students to learn about healthy lifestyle habits in an effort to fight the national obesity epidemic. Listen to learn more about how a gardening and cooking project at a school in Maine is a rewarding way to learn about nutrition and healthy lifestyle skills through hands-on class activities.

Read More
Letters to juliet
ELA • ELL

Letters to Juliet

William Shakespeare’s tragic romance of star crossed lovers, based on an Italian tale, graced stages in the 1590’s and continues to capture audiences and imagination today. Modern adaptations demonstrate the timelessness of this romantic tragedy. Juliet appeals so directly to people that they actually write to her! Listen to learn more about the Juliet Club and the 6,000 letters they receive a year.

Read More
Life on and off the res
ELA • ELL

Life on and off the 'Rez': Native American Identity in Literature

"The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian," tells the story of Arnold Spirit, a young Native American who leaves the reservation to get a better education. In this semi-autobiographical book, author Sherman Alexie discusses big issues including choosing your identity, figuring out where you belong and the hardships American Indians face living on reservations.

Read More
Losing weight while you sleep
Science

Losing Weight While You Sleep

You are losing weight, just by breathing! This public radio story describes how people lose weight when sleeping, and that much of that lost weight comes simply from breathing. You will learn how matter is recycled and how everyone contains atoms from historical figures. The story also helps you visualize just how small and numerous atoms and molecules are.

Read More
13379538154 88101e1ba7 o
ELA

Mark Twain and Samuel Clemens

Samuel Clemens became famous as an author under his pen-name, Mark Twain. As one of the most famous American authors of his time, Twain is well known for his biting sense of humor and keen sense of observation. As Samuel Clemens, though, his life was complex and tumultuous, often directly contradicting the things his alter ego said in books and articles. Listen to find out how one of America’s greatest novelists lived, and how that may have informed his writing.

Read More
Maya angelous life and legacy
ELA • ELL

Maya Angelou's Life and Legacy

Maya Angelou was an author, poet and icon. She grew up during segregation and used her work to empower and give voice to the African American community. Her memoir, "I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings" changed the literary world and opened doors for African American authors and women.

Read More
Mice morphing at warp speed
Science

Mice Evolving at Warp Speed

Changes to a neighborhood park in Illinois have affected the Northern White-Footed mice who live in the forest nearby. In this audio story, you'll hear from a scientist who is studying living mice today and comparing them to museum samples of dead mice to understand how they've changed and why. What they are finding is that the mice are growing much faster than their ancestors. Listen to learn more about their fascinating story.

Read More