Topic: Young Adult Literature

Young adult dystopia

ELA High School

Young Adult Dystopia

Science Fiction Young Adult Literature

Dystopian fiction is tremendously popular with young people all over the US right now. Books like "The Hunger Games" dominate bestseller lists for young people. But what is so appealing about this genre? This story features commentary from teens themselves and from scholars who study the subject. Listen to find out why this genre has such an impact on its audience.

Read More
Pexels photo 358042

ELA High School

Poetry and Basketball in "The Crossover"

Sports Young Adult Literature

The crossover dribble is a basketball move. But to some people it’s more than just a move, it is poetry. “The Crossover,” is a Newbery-Award-winning basketball novel by author Kwame Alexander. Students can relate in many ways to the themes in the novel, such as struggling with relationships, loneliness, and loss. In this audio story you will hear from the book’s author and hear students discuss how basketball is a kind of poetry in motion and how language and writing can capture that sense of cadence and rhythm as well. Listen to learn more about how author Kwame Alexander was motivated to write about the poetics of basketball and how readers relate to and are inspired by the tragedy and triumph in “The Crossover.”

Read More
Screen shot 2018 03 07 at 12.30.46 pm

ELA High School

Low

What Motivated the Author of "When You Reach Me"

Young Adult Literature

Books allow us to transcend the world we live in, but they also help us to connect to the people and places around us. In this audio story, several young students at a school in Washington D.C. talk about the plot, characterization, themes, and motifs in the book “When You Reach Me.” The author, Rebecca Stead, discusses what motivates and inspires her to write. This book includes clues to solve a puzzle, mysterious notes, time travel, and the excitement of figuring out a book as you read it. Listen to more about the novel, “When You Reach Me” as these students discuss the elements of fiction and question the author about her own creative process.

Read More
Catcher in the rye red cover

ELA High School

Does ‘The Catcher in the Rye’ Still Resonate?

Literature Culture Fiction American Literature Classics Young Adult Literature Censorship Realistic Fiction

J.D. Salinger’s 1951 novel “The Catcher in the Rye” has long been a staple of high school reading lists, though it has also frequently been banned from them. The story is told by Holden Caulfield, a rebellious 17-year old who has just been expelled from prep school. The novel is considered a classic of American literature, and Holden is thought to be a character every teenager can relate to—but is this still true today? Listen to hear about how this novel earned its status as a classic and the arguments in the debate about whether it should still be required reading for high school students.

Read More
Young adults and choices

ELA Middle School

Low

Natalie Babbitt Writes for Young Readers in 'Tuck Everlasting'

Literature Fiction Young Adult Literature Coming of Age

Author Natalie Babbitt has been writing books for young people for four decades. Her respect for young readers shines through in the themes of her novels, from love and everlasting life in “Tuck Everlasting” to money and dreams in her first non-fantasy novel, “The Moon Over High Street.” In this interview, Babbitt describes her perspective on writing for young people.

Read More
Life on and off the res

ELA Middle School

Life on a Reservation: Native American Identity in Literature

Race Education Culture Fiction Young Adult Literature Autobiography

"The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian," tells the story of Arnold Spirit, a young Native American who leaves the reservation to get a better education. In this semi-autobiographical book, author Sherman Alexie discusses big issues including choosing your identity, figuring out where you belong and the hardships American Indians face living on reservations.

Read More
A wrinkle in time continues its journey

ELA Middle School

'A Wrinkle in Time' Continues its Journey

Gender Fiction Science Fiction Young Adult Literature Children's Literature

"A Wrinkle in Time," a famous novel by Madeleine L’Engle, is the story of teenager Meg Murry. Meg is transported on an adventure through time and space with her younger brother and friend as they try to rescue her father. When it was originally published in 1963, no publisher knew how to promote it. What is it about “A Wrinkle in Time,” and why is it so controversial 50 years after its publication?

Read More
Yas first modern heroine anne of green gables

ELA Middle School

YA's First Modern Heroine: 'Anne of Green Gables'

Gender Fiction Drama Young Adult Literature

One of the most enduring novels written for young adults is "Anne of Green Gables," by Lucy Maud Montgomery, published in 1908. It was one of the first YA novels to feature a strong, unconventional female lead—Anne, the unwanted, unloved, but unbowed orphan who grabs hold of a chance for a new life and refuses to let go, no matter how difficult things get. Before Anne, most heroines were beautiful and angelic. "Anne of Green Gables" is over 100 years old, but its heroine measures up to any female lead contemporary YA novels have to offer.

Read More
Fighting injustice through literature

ELA Middle School

Fighting Injustice in 'The Book Thief'

Religion World War II Fiction war Historical Fiction Young Adult Literature Censorship

The novel "The Book Thief" is narrated by Death. He tells the story of a young German girl saving books from Nazi bonfires to read to the Jewish man hiding in her home. But the novel was actually written by author Markus Zusak. In this public radio story, he explains his choice of Death as the narrator, and the message he hopes teenage readers get from the novel.

Read More