Topic: Gender

320px young saudi arabian woman in abha

Current Event June 23, 2016

Saudi Girl's Diary

Gender Elementary Culture

This story follows a Saudi Arabian teenage girl over two years. It’s a personally narrated audio diary of a young woman who is in college and dreams of being a scientist and getting her PhD. While she is keeping this audio diary, she interviews her family and friends and explores her dreams and beliefs. Listen to hear scenes from her life.

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Current Event April 28, 2017

Debate: How Can the Meaning of Art Be Changed?

Gender Arts

The sculpture ‘Fearless Girl,’ is the name given to a statue that was placed directly in front of the famous Wall Street Bull statue. The statue depicts the girl putting her hands on her hips and staring down the bull, symbolizing female possibility. However, many feel the statue is an empty gesture and that it is condescending to represent womanhood with a cute young girl. Some think it changes the meaning of the bull from a symbol of strength to a symbol of a villain. Listen to learn more about the statue’s impact as well as the controversy surrounding it, then debate whether the meaning of art can be changed.

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Current Event September 30, 2016

Debate: Should Schools Give Trigger Warnings for Sensitive Content?

Race Gender Psychology

Across college campuses, the idea of "trigger warnings," giving a heads-up to students before uncomfortable topics are discussed, and creating safe spaces for students to feel comfortable talking about their experiences, is gaining traction. Some people think this provides support for people who have been victimized and prevents triggering a recurrence of past trauma. Others people think this makes it possible for students to avoid certain topics and different perspectives that make them feel uncomfortable. The University of Chicago has decided not to give ‘trigger warnings’. Listen to this story to understand why and then debate the different perspectives on this policy.

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A wrinkle in time continues its journey

ELA Middle School

'A Wrinkle in Time' Continues its Journey

Gender Fiction Science Fiction Young Adult Literature Children's Literature

"A Wrinkle in Time," a famous novel by Madeleine L’Engle, is the story of teenager Meg Murry. Meg is transported on an adventure through time and space with her younger brother and friend as they try to rescue her father. When it was originally published in 1963, no publisher knew how to promote it. What is it about “A Wrinkle in Time,” and why is it so controversial 50 years after its publication?

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Current Event April 20, 2017

Female Hockey Players Fight for Fair Wages

Gender Sports

Women on sports teams make significantly less money than their male counterparts. USA Hockey dedicates fewer resources to the growth of women's hockey and provides less support. The U.S. Women’s National Hockey Team threatened to boycott the world championship unless their financial support was increased. They reached an agreement last month with USA Hockey, promising to increase the salaries of the female athletes. Listen to hear more about this historic agreement.

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Current Event October 22, 2013

Malala Yousafzai Continues Fight for Girls' Education

Civics/Government World History II Gender Civil RIghts

Sixteen-year-old Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by the Taliban in the Swat Valley of Pakistan because she campaigned for education for girls. After recovering from her injury in England, she has now released a book, met with President Obama, and been considered for the Nobel Peace Prize. Malala's father compares her fight for equal education to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s own battle for equal rights. Listen to her interview to start a discussion about advocacy, rights, and education.

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Kids of kabul

ELA Middle School

Education in Kabul, A World of War

Gender Education Middle East Nonfiction

The United States declared war on Afghanistan in response to the terrorist attacks of September 11, 2001. But Afghanistan had already been a troubled and war torn country for many, many years. In 1996, the Taliban seized control of the country, imposing strict rule over all of its citizens. This story focuses on how the strict rules of society in Afghanistan continue to affect its people--especially children and girls. Listen to this interview with the author of “The Kids of Kabul” and learn more about the challenges faced by Afghan children and women, especially in the area of education.

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Henrik ibsen portrait

ELA High School

Ibsen’s ‘Hedda Gabler’ Meets Robots

Gender Fiction Drama Classics Theater

The play "Hedda Gabler" by Henrik Ibsen was written in 1891. It features a female protagonist who feels trapped and bored by her loveless marriage and the rules of Victorian society, and relieves her frustration through manipulating others. A play called "Heddatron," is a comedic reinterpretation of "Hedda Gabler." The producers of "Heddatron" updated the play for a 21st century audience by incorporating robots into the cast. As new forms of technology are showing up in unexpected places, the integration of robots in this play challenges our thinking about the role of technology in our culture and our society. Listen to this story to learn why the producers decided to bring robots into a century-old play, and what challenges they faced in bringing their reinterpretation to the stage.

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Current Event March 29, 2017

Nobel Peace Prize Winner Aung San Suu Kyi

Politics Gender Global

During Women’s History Month, we celebrate the accomplishments of women who have made change in the world. Aung San Suu Kyi, a Burmese politician, diplomat and author who shaped the opposition of Myanmar, also known as Burma, is one such leader. She was awarded the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991 because of her opposition to the military dictatorship. But she was unable to leave Burma to accept the prize because she was under house arrest. In 2012 she was freed from house arrest and gave her Nobel prize acceptance speech. Listen to this story about her speech accepting the Nobel Prize and learn more about Suu Kyi’s legacy that led to her to win the award.

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Current Event March 17, 2016

Book Characters of Color

Race Gender Children's Literature

Many of the characters in books written for students are white males. They don’t reflect everyone’s background. One girl became frustrated when she couldn’t connect to the characters. In response, she began to gather books about black girls and then give these books to schools. Now that she has exceeded her original goal and collected almost 4,000 books, the girl has started to consider how to impact schools in an even larger way. Listen to the story hear more about this remarkable campaign.

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Current Event March 16, 2017

Social Media, Girls and Depression

Gender Psychology Technology

Studies show that teen girls are more vulnerable to depression. In fact, girls are three times more likely than boys to become depressed, due in part to social pressures such as the overemphasis on physical appearance and the prevalence of social media. Not only are girls more likely to use social media, they also appear to be more vulnerable to the emotionally damaging effects of a constant, virtual connection. Listen to learn more about trends in teenage depression and the role of social media.

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Yas first modern heroine anne of green gables

ELA Middle School

YA's First Modern Heroine: 'Anne of Green Gables'

Gender Fiction Drama Young Adult Literature

One of the most enduring novels written for young adults is "Anne of Green Gables," by Lucy Maud Montgomery, published in 1908. It was one of the first YA novels to feature a strong, unconventional female lead—Anne, the unwanted, unloved, but unbowed orphan who grabs hold of a chance for a new life and refuses to let go, no matter how difficult things get. Before Anne, most heroines were beautiful and angelic. "Anne of Green Gables" is over 100 years old, but its heroine measures up to any female lead contemporary YA novels have to offer.

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The characterization of jo march and the lasting impact of little women

ELA Middle School

The Lasting Legacy of 'Little Women'

Gender Fiction American Literature Women's Rights

When Louisa May Alcott wrote “Little Women” at the request of her publisher it became an instant hit. The story of four sisters, Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy March, still inspires young women nearly 150 years later. What do these four women represent? How can we understand Jo’s independence in the context of her era? And how does the novel reflect and differ from the life of its author Louisa May Alcott? Listen to learn more about the lasting legacy of “Little Women.”

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Editing jane austen

ELA High School

Editing Jane Austen

Literature Gender Fiction Classics Narrative Writing Process

Jane Austen wrote a new type of female character. Emma Woodhouse of "Emma" and Elizabeth Bennet in "Pride and Prejudice" are two memorable characters. They were charming but normal, flawed but winning. The legend of Austen is that she wrote her novels exactly as they were published, but the release of her original manuscripts suggests she had an active editor. Does it matter that an editor helped clean up Austen’s prose or is it her genius that shines through?

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Current Event September 8, 2014

Candidates Try To Appeal To Male Voters With Sports

Civics/Government Gender

The gender gap in voting preferences in the 2012 election was the largest in history. Men voted overwhelmingly for Republican candidates, women voted Democratic. Men also vote less frequently than women. This has pushed politicians to focus on how they can effectively reach men, particularly young men. Today’s public radio story looks at ad placement and self-presentation as candidates try to reach more men.

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Current Event April 13, 2016

The First Female Computer Programmer

Gender Technology

Grace Hopper played an important role in creating the tech world. She left her job as a college professor and joined the Navy Reserve during World War II. Later, she was on the team at Harvard that wrote the first programmable computer code language. She succeeded in a number of male-dominated fields and became an icon in the computer world. Listen to hear more about the woman who helped start the computer revolution.

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Current Event January 14, 2016

Working Women

Economics Gender

Child care is at the center of economic policy in Japan. As Japan’s population ages and shrinks, the country is looking to give the economy a boost by attracting more women to the workforce. The problem is young mothers have a difficult time finding daycare due to limited child care options. And Japanese culture sees caretaking and household duties as women’s domain, so parents typically do not share the work at home equally.The government is taking steps to help more women join the workforce.

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