Topic: Agriculture

Current Event November 19, 2020

Barbershop Therapy

Race Agriculture Human Behavior

African Americans have been hit especially hard by the pandemic, and many are feeling extra stress. Barbershops in African American communities have long been hubs of communication and camaraderie. A program called the “Confess Project” is aiding barbers who serve these communities in counseling their customers, offering helpful emotional support as well as a haircut. The program aims to offer African American men, in particular, a safe space to share their feelings and get advice. Listen to hear a participating barber explain what attracted him to the program and how his work improves his clients’ mental health.

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Current Event April 3, 2020

Debate: Should Online Discussions Be Preserved as Historical Records?

Technology History Agriculture

Online discussions document history as it is lived, functioning as digital primary source artifacts. As Verizon prepared to delete archives of Yahoo Groups, among the earliest online discussions on the internet, some people were upset. They argued that these online discussions offered a valuable record of life in the early 2000s that should be preserved. Verizon said that maintaining the archives required resources that they wanted to use for other priorities. Listen to hear more about the dispute over Yahoo Groups and then debate: Should online discussions be preserved as historical records?

Update: Verizon deleted all content from Yahoo Groups on January 31st 2020, allowing users to archive their data before that date.

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Current Event February 21, 2020

Debate: Should You Read the Book Before You Watch the Movie?

Literature Arts Agriculture

Filmmakers often make movies based on popular and beloved books, prompting audiences to wonder whether to read the book or watch the movie first. The argument has been made that movie adaptations can broaden the audience for books, especially older classics. Another view is that people who see the movie version of a book first will miss out on the benefit of fully engaging their imaginations while reading. Listen to hear a discussion about popular books and movies that raises points on both sides and then debate: Should you read the book before you watch the movie?

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Current Event July 17, 2019

Changing Consumers' Minds About "Ugly" Produce

Environment Climate Change Human Impacts KERA Agriculture Nutrition Business Industry Plants Conservation

Would you eat a scarred, lumpy carrot or an apple that is oddly shaped? Grocery stores do not typically sell these types of “ugly” produce, but some new companies aim to reduce food waste by selling fruits and vegetables that are rejected by stores. Listen to learn about the benefits of these efforts and find out what else you can do to reduce food waste.

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Current Event June 10, 2019

Flooding and Tariffs Concern Farmers

Politics Agriculture Climate Weather

Midwestern states are experiencing extreme flooding caused by excessive rain, which is interfering with planting seasons for farmers. In addition, the ongoing trade war with China has caused agricultural exports to fall. The government has offered a financial relief package for farmers affected by the trade war, but recent news about a possible trade dispute with Mexico is adding to farmers’ worries. Listen to hear about how the recent flooding and trade wars are affecting midwestern farmers.

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Current Event June 3, 2019

The Effects of Tariffs

Politics Economics Agriculture Trade International Industry Business

The trade war between China and the United States continues with the Chinese government imposing more tariffs on U.S. imports. While the two nations are arguing about business practices and intellectual property, it is mostly individuals who are feeling the consequences of the trade dispute, which seems far from resolution. Listen to hear more about how U.S. residents are feeling the effects of the trade war between the global superpowers and what could come next.

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ELA

A Flowering Tribute To Emily Dickinson

Poetry Agriculture American Literature Conservation Classics Writing Process Shaping Identity

The New York Botanical Garden created an exhibit to honor Emily Dickinson. She was a nineteenth-century American poet who wrote unique verses, often about the nature of life and death. The new exhibit celebrates her hobbies, family, and experiences from a surprising perspective. Listen to learn what Dickinson was actually known for in her lifetime (hint: it’s not poetry!).

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Current Event November 2, 2018

Debate: Should farmers be allowed to use a powerful weed killer?

Technology Environment Agriculture

A popular, powerful weed killer has been banned in Arkansas, but some farmers are still using it. The herbicide intended for weeds also harms crops and wildlife. Although some farmers are planting new varieties of soybeans and cotton that are resistant to the weed killer, others are not. When farmers with the resistant crops spray the weed killer, it impacts their neighbors’ farms, often with dire consequences. Listen to hear about the battle in Arkansas among neighboring farmers, and then debate: Should farmers be allowed to use a powerful weed killer?

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Current Event November 30, 2017

Class Differences in Ancient History

Ancient Civilization Agriculture Class

The gap between rich and poor is one of the great concerns of modern times. It's even leading archaeologists to look more closely at wealth disparities in ancient societies. The rise of agriculture in the ancient world led to an unequal distribution of wealth, due to access to work animals and land. Scientists have discovered that the societies in the Americas were more egalitarian than those in Europe. Listen to hear more about how ancient societies can help us understand issues in society today.

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Current Event November 21, 2017

Farming and Vets

war Agriculture

Nearly 4,000 Vermont veterans have served in Iraq and Afghanistan since 9/11. Many veterans are still dealing with the invisible wounds of war. Some of them, however, have begun to find healing through farming. One veteran who is raising pigs and goats is enjoying his days with animals and says it changed the way he sees his life. Listen to hear more about this veteran’s experience and other stories about veterans who have begun farming as a way to recover from the events of war.

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Current Event August 2, 2017

Understanding the Vanilla Shortage

Economics Africa Agriculture

There is a global vanilla crisis. Recently there’s been a global shortage of vanilla that’s affecting bakeries and ice cream shops across the country. The spice is primarily grown in Madagascar, an island off the southeast coast of Africa. Listen to this story to hear what caused this shortage and the dangers and problems faced by vanilla growers.

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Current Event March 30, 2017

The Footprint of a Loaf of Bread

Environment Human Impacts Agriculture

Researchers have completed a study that documents the environmental impact of producing a loaf of bread. They determined the amount of greenhouse gas emissions at each stage of bread production—from wheat farming to transportation—and added up the total. They found that 2.6 million tons of greenhouse gases are emitted each year in the U.K. as a result of bread production. The study’s authors hope the findings will lead to more efficient and sustainable production methods. Listen to learn more about the environmental footprint of a loaf of bread and how consumers can help make a difference.

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Current Event February 2, 2017

Storing Rain Underground

Weather and Climate Agriculture

California has been in a severe drought since 2014. It’s underground aquifers, which are permeable rocks that can hold groundwater are dry. During recent droughts, farmers pumped groundwater to irrigate their crops, which dropped the water table and drained the aquifers. In the Sierra Nevada Mountains, they are also getting less snow and more rain, which just runs into the ocean. Farmers are now experimenting with water management and ways to store excess water. With some recent heavy rains, rivers all over the state flooded and some farmers flooded their fields, letting the water seep deep into the ground to refill the aquifers. Listen to hear about ways to catch and store rainfall to help farmers.

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Current Event September 13, 2016

A Glut of Cheese is Driving Prices Down

Agriculture Trade

There is a currently a surplus of cheese and dairy products in the United States, and it’s a global phenomenon. Two years ago, dairy farmers expanded production due to the high demand in China and Russia. After a sudden drop in demand, there is a surplus of 1.3 billion pounds of cheese in storage. The U.S. government is helping these dairy farms by buying some of the extra cheese and giving it to food banks. Dairy farmers will get some relief from falling prices and food banks will be able to give more cheese away. Listen to hear more about this huge surplus of cheese.

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Current Event May 31, 2015

Bird Flu Sweeps Across the West

Civics/Government Life Science Health Agriculture

A new and deadly strain of avian influenza, or bird flu, has hit poultry farms in the Midwest. This outbreak is new and surprising because infectious disease experts don’t know how it is spreading. The old theory that the disease is spread between birds in close contact has not been consistent with this mutated strain of bird flu. Millions of chickens and turkeys have died so far, impacting both farmers and consumers. Listen to learn more about this disease and its transmission.

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Current Event January 23, 2015

Florida Citrus in Crisis

Life Science Economics Agriculture

As you drink your morning orange juice, you might not think about where it comes from. Oranges and other citrus are an important base for the Florida economy. The citrus industry and the related jobs in Florida are under threat from a new insect borne infection known as “citrus greening.” Listen to learn more about this disease and how citrus farmers are coping with this changing landscape.

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Current Event October 3, 2014

Growing Heirloom Apples a Life Long Devotion

Life Science Economics Genetics Agriculture

It is apple picking season and apple lovers are gearing up to eat some tasty and unique apples. The apples we are used to seeing in the supermarket are the same basic size and shape. And they have the familiar flavor profiles. But there are more apple varieties than you might imagine. There's a whole world of biodiversity in apples. This public radio story takes you to a heirloom apple orchard in Vermont that specializes in grafting and maintaining historic varieties of apples. Get ready to visualize (and almost taste!) some unique looking apples.

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