Topic: Africa

34587335161 8a2c6eb4f8 z

Current Event October 24, 2017

Smooth Transition of Power in African Nation

Politics Africa

For the first time in 38 years, Angola has a new president. José Eduardo dos Santos had ruled Angola since 1979, soon after its independence from Portugal in 1975. He handpicked his successor, João Lourenço, who was the former Defence Minister. Lourenço won the presidential election and faces the challenge of bringing change to the country. Half of Angola’s citizens live in poverty and the hope is that Lourenço will fight corruption in the country. Listen to hear more about this peaceful transition of power.

Read More
8726380918 ddbc3b4212 z

Current Event September 26, 2017

Kenyan Elections Annulled for Fraud

Law Africa Democracy

In a surprise and historic ruling, Kenya's Supreme Court annulled the recent presidential election. It threw out the re-election of President Uhuru Kenyatta due to illegalities and irregularities, and ordered a new election within two months. This ruling was a surprise and sends a message that even those in power can be challenged by the court. Listen to hear more about these elections and this historic decision not only for an African nation but for any country.

Read More
2934298346 ff644dda9d z

Current Event August 28, 2017

Situation in South Sudan Going from Bad to Worse

Africa Violence

South Sudan is the most recently formalized country in the world. The predominantly Christian south separated from the Arab north in 2011, which was a victory for many southern soldiers and people. Unfortunately, the south’s triumphs did not last long. Civil War and famine have impacted South Sudan’s ability to grow as a country, with nearly 60% of the country on the brink of starvation. Listen to this story to hear about the many struggles the South Sudanese face, and hear from others who still have hope.

Read More
4556343269 6dd2fe8545 z

Current Event August 22, 2017

Rwandan President Brings Stability After Genocide

Politics Africa Democracy

Paul Kagame has been in power in Rwanda for nearly two decades. Kagame is a national hero, leading a rebel army that ousted the government and put an end to the Rwandan genocide in 1994. While Rwanda boasts a healthy democracy and strong support for Kagame, opposing candidates claim that Rwandans are simply scared of their government. Citing examples of rhetoric used against his political opponents, critics hope to bring light to his authoritarianism. Listen to this story to hear about Kagame’s rise to power, his rival candidates, and the future of Rwanda.

Note: Soon after this story originally aired, Kagame won the presidential election

Read More
3188842491 36b9af1c96 o

Current Event August 2, 2017

Understanding the Vanilla Shortage

Economics Africa Agriculture

There is a global vanilla crisis. Recently there’s been a global shortage of vanilla that’s affecting bakeries and ice cream shops across the country. The spice is primarily grown in Madagascar, an island off the southeast coast of Africa. Listen to this story to hear what caused this shortage and the dangers and problems faced by vanilla growers.

Read More
14623518860 8fb9c8b44b h

ELA High School

'Master Harold … and the Boys' by Fugard

Politics Race Literature Africa

Throughout his life in South Africa, playwright Athol Fugard witnessed firsthand the cruelty and injustice of apartheid. Not only did racism fracture the country he loved so dearly, but it also created profound strain in his relationship with his father, whom he calls “a huge bigot.” Many elements of that difficult and complex relationship resonate throughout Athol’s play “‘Master Harold‘. . . and the Boys,” which became a Broadway hit at the peak of the anti-apartheid movement. Lisa Fugard, Athol’s daughter, also grew up in South Africa but left the country to pursue an acting career and later became a writer. Listen to hear about how both father and daughter explored their personal and the political struggles brought about by apartheid.

Read More
389523086 ac0a2a7def z

Current Event March 13, 2017

Famine Threatens South Sudan

Africa war

South Sudan is currently struggling with both drought and an ongoing civil war. These forces have led to a rising food shortage crisis that the United Nations is now calling a famine. Four million people are without sufficient food, and the U.N. warns that another million people will be affected in the coming months. Unfortunately, the international community has been unable to halt the escalation of famine in South Sudan. Listen to learn more about the crisis in South Sudan, and how the international community monitors and responds to famine.

Read More
3457997382 364e6630df b

ELA High School

Achebe on the ‘Heart of Darkness’

Race Culture Africa Colonialism Imperialism World Literature

In Joseph Conrad’s 1899 novella "Heart of Darkness," an English sailor tells the tale of his voyage on the Congo River in Africa. The novel, which is set during the height of British imperialism in Africa, contrasts “civilized” Europeans with “uncivilized” African natives and describes the brutal treatment of Africans by European traders. Nigerian novelist Chinua Achebe’s 1958 novel "Things Fall Apart" provides a contrast to Conrad’s story, describing the British colonization of Africa from the perspective of Africans. In this audio story, Achebe talks about how his understanding of "Heart of Darkness" changed over time.

Read More
Child soldiers

ELA High School

Child Soldiers: Memoir from Sierra Leone

Africa Civil War Violence Historical Fiction World Literature Realistic Fiction

In this story Ishmael Beah, author of "Radiance of Tomorrow" and "A Long Way Gone," is interviewed about his experience as a child soldier in Sierra Leone. He talks about his understanding of the effects of war on his country. Beah describes the lessons of war, the impact fighting has on nature, as well as the resilience of his people. Listen to learn more about Beah’s harrowing but inspirational story.

Read More
1.migrant original

Current Event August 23, 2015

Migrant Crisis in Europe

Immigration Middle East Ethics Africa

Thousands of migrants fleeing instability in Africa and the Middle East are in a refugee camp in a small town on the coast of France. It’s become a refugee crisis for France as the migrants are living in campsites, building their own homes and waiting for asylum in France or transport to Britain. Many are teenagers without families, and the camp can sometimes be a competitive environment where only the fittest survive. But there are also inspiring stories of people with little helping those who have less. The camp does not provide shelter, which is one of the many ways it does not meet international standards for refugees, says an international aid group. Listen to hear more about this crisis that doesn’t have a ready solution.

Read More