Topic: Race

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Current Event May 8, 2015

Is the American Dream Out of Reach?

Civics/Government Economics Race Poetry

How realistic is the “American Dream”? Is upward mobility a reality for everyone today? Are people still better off than their parents? These are the questions driving a study of economic mobility by economists at Harvard and UC Berkeley, as well as the radio reporter in this story. With a focus on Dayton, Ohio, its past and present, this story analyzes the modern factors that stunt economic mobility in West Dayton and other neighborhoods like it. It looks at whether the “American Dream” is truly attainable for everyone.

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Current Event May 1, 2015

Unrest In Baltimore

Civics/Government Economics Race

On the morning of April 12, 2015 Freddie Gray, a 25-year-old black man from Baltimore, was arrested by police and fell into a coma as a result of spinal cord injuries sustained while in police custody. He died on April 19th, a week after his arrest. The officers involved have been suspended with pay but there have been no public answers about what happened. Peaceful protests in Baltimore turned violent, leading to riots and property destruction. This incident tapped into anger and resentment in a city known for racial segregation, economic marginalization and police violence. Listen to learn more about the way these tensions played out in one neighborhood during the violence.

Update: The six police officers involved in Gray's death were charged with a range of crimes including murder. They have pled not guilty.

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Current Event April 30, 2015

NYC Built on the Backs of Slaves

Civics/Government Race US History I

New York City is planning to acknowledge its rarely discussed history in the slave trade with an official marker at the location that served as the city’s slave market from 1711 to 1762. From its founding as New Amsterdam, the city was shaped by slavery. Slaves physically built the infrastructure of lower Manhattan. In the city’s early days bankers and merchants grew rich from their connection to the trade of Southern sugar and cotton, which was based on slave labor. New York’s wealth was so connected to slavery the mayor of New York proposed the city side with the South and secede from the Union during the Civil War. Listen to learn more about the fascinating history of slavery in this modern day progressive city.

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Current Event April 3, 2015

Integrating College Basketball in the South

Race Sports Civil RIghts

Basketball fans across the country are preparing for the exciting end of March Madness, the NCAA basketball tournament. As Kentucky drives towards a undefeated season, this story remembers a time when the Southeastern Conference (SEC) was not integrated. Despite the Voting Rights Act of 1964, racism in the South was still commonplace and public. Perry Wallace stepped onto the basketball court for Vanderbilt University in 1966 and became the first black varsity athlete in the Southeastern Conference. Listen to learn more about the climate of Southern basketball in the late 1960s and how Perry Wallace survived and thrived.

Warning: Quotes in this story contain strong language.

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Current Event March 17, 2015

Police and the Constitution

Civics/Government Race Constitution

Recently there’s been more violence in Ferguson, Missouri. Two police officers were shot last week while protecting the police department during a protest. The violence comes months after police shot and killed an unarmed black teenager last August. The U.S. Department of Justice (DOJ) investigated the police department in Ferguson and found a pattern of discrimination against black residents in everything from traffic stops to use of force. Listen to learn more about this DOJ report and how police in Ferguson were found to be violating the Constitution.

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Current Event March 10, 2015

Selma 50 Years Later

Civics/Government Race US History II

Fifty years ago, a bloody confrontation on the Edmund Pettus Bridge in Selma, Alabama exposed the nation to the racial injustice and brutality of the American South. This event paved the way for the Voting Rights Act of 1965, forcing all municipalities to allow black residents to register to vote. Listen to learn more about this historic event in the Civil Rights Movement from people who participated in Bloody Sunday.

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Current Event February 23, 2015

Remembering Malcolm X

Race US History II

Malcolm X was both charismatic and feared, and he advocated black power as a response to white racism. On February 21, 1965 he was assassinated while on stage giving a speech in Harlem. Thirty-nine year old Malcolm X was shot by three gunmen from the Nation of Islam, a group he had left the previous year. For the 50th anniversary of his killing, listen to this story about the life and legacy of this influential black leader.

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Current Event February 18, 2015

Diversity on Television

Race Storytelling Memoir

ABC’s new show “Fresh Off The Boat” is the first show on network television to feature an Asian American family in over 20 years. The story of a Taiwanese family who moves to Orlando Florida is inspired by the life of chef Eddie Huang. The show is starting a much needed conversation about diversity on television and the danger of having so few Asian American characters on television. Listen to learn more about the challenge of creating culturally real content in this fresh new show.

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Life on and off the res

ELA Middle School

Life on a Reservation: Native American Identity in Literature

Race Education Culture Fiction Young Adult Literature Autobiography

"The Absolutely True Diary of a Part-Time Indian," tells the story of Arnold Spirit, a young Native American who leaves the reservation to get a better education. In this semi-autobiographical book, author Sherman Alexie discusses big issues including choosing your identity, figuring out where you belong and the hardships American Indians face living on reservations.

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Social injustice and racism in to kill a mockingbird the civil rights movement and today

ELA High School

Injustice in "To Kill a Mockingbird" and the Civil Rights Movement

Race Protest Civil RIghts Fiction Historical Fiction

The novel To Kill a Mockingbird was written more than 50 years ago and yet its themes of racism and civil rights remain relevant today. In this story author James McBride who wrote The Color of Water explains why the book inspired generations of American writers.

Update: This story first aired in 2010. In July 2015, a newly discovered novel written by Harper Lee in the 1950s was published. The novel is called Go Set a Watchman.

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Current Event January 15, 2015

Selma and Civil Rights

Civics/Government Race US History II

The 1965 voting rights march in Selma, Alabama exposed police brutality to the world and set the stage for the passage of the Voting Rights Act. The movie ‘Selma’ tells the story of Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. and the movement in Selma in a new and authentic way. Listen to learn more about traditional Hollywood depictions of civil rights and how this movie has broken that mold.

WARNING: THIS AUDIO STORY CONTAINS STRONG LANGUAGE

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Harriettubman

Current Event December 20, 2014

Honoring Harriet Tubman

Race US History I Biography

Harriet Tubman escaped slavery in Maryland and then used her freedom and the Underground Railroad to free more than 70 slaves. Known as the “Moses of Her People,” Tubman lived a purposeful life fighting slavery. She also joined the fight for women’s suffrage after the Civil War. Congress has approved the creation of two national historic parks, one in Maryland and the other in New York, to commemorate and honor the life of this pioneering woman.

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Current Event December 14, 2014

Protests Now and in the Past

Civics/Government Race US History II civil rights

The grand jury decision not to indict the white New York City police officer responsible for the chokehold death of Eric Garner during an arrest, has led to protests across the country. From die-ins that block traffic to shutting down shopping malls, these efforts require organization, passion and a high degree of communication. This public radio story looks at how today’s social actions are organized and what they’ve learned from the civil rights movement.

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Current Event October 24, 2014

The Word Genocide

Civics/Government Race World History II World War II

Although the concept of genocide has been around for a long time, the word “genocide” is relatively new. A new documentary tells the story of a Polish man who coined the term in 1943, and then advocated for its widespread adoption and recognition. He possessed a strong sense of justice, and he felt determined that crimes related to genocide should be prosecuted. Listen to hear more about this inspirational man and the powerful documentary that tells his story.

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Current Event October 22, 2014

Breaking Barriers: The Navy's Highest Ranking Woman

Civics/Government Race Gender US History II

When Michelle Howard was growing up, women weren’t admitted to the Naval Academy. Now she is second in command of the Navy. And she is the first African American woman to earn the rank of a four-star admiral. This conversation with her will inspire listeners to pursue their dreams, overcome barriers, and find community no matter where you are.

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