Topic: Economics

Scientists.square

Current Event September 25, 2014

The Future of Scientific Discoveries in Jeopardy

Civics/Government Life Science Economics Technology

In the last decade, increases in government funding to scientific research through the National Institute of Health (NIH) has spurred massive growth at universities across the country. Now, with congressional reductions in discretionary spending, inflation and increasing cost of research, scientists across the country have lost the NIH funding that was at the core of the research. Listen to this public radio story to hear how scientists at three different research institutes are dealing with this funding squeeze.

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Border.square

Current Event September 24, 2014

A 13-year-old Child Migrant Tells His Story

Civics/Government Economics Immigration

This summer an unprecedented number of unaccompanied young people crossed the border illegally into the United States. Many came with hopes of reuniting with family in the U.S. and escaping violence in their home countries. Now, their futures are uncertain as they are put in detention centers while their cases are processed. In today’s public radio story you meet a 13-year-old migrant and his 11-year-old brother and hear from them about their journey across the border.

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Scotland.600.600

Current Event September 22, 2014

Scotland Votes No to Independence

Civics/Government Economics World History I

On Thursday Scottish citizens, 16 and above, turned out in record numbers to vote on the referendum on Scottish independence from the United Kingdom. Scotland and England joined to become the United Kingdom of Britain in 1707. Three-hundred and seven years later, 55% of Scottish voters voted No to independence and chose to remain in the United Kingdom. But this does not mean the status quo will remain the same. British Prime Minister David Cameron has promised Scots increased autonomy and decision making power over Scottish domestic policy. Listen to this public radio story with your class and discuss what the vote means for the future of unified United Kingdom.

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Current Event September 12, 2014

The Changing Role of NATO

Life Science Economics Agriculture

This summer pork and beef prices are 11% higher than they were last summer. This rise in cost has not changed the buying habits of consumers. Today’s public radio story looks at the economics behind this rise in cost, and how supply and demand play into cost. It also features the perspective of farmers and people in the pork industry. Listen to learn why the supply of pork and beef is much lower this year than in years past.

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Current Event September 11, 2014

Organizing Labor Movements Without Unions

Civics/Government Economics Technology Labor

The success of workers at the Massachusetts supermarket chain, Market Basket, is making labor movements across the country rethink their strategies. In this labor dispute, workers walked off the job to protest the CEO of the company being fired. They didn’t come back to work until he was reinstated by the board of directors. All this was accomplished without a union. This public radio story looks at the ways the Market Basket strike is unique and how it can and can’t be duplicated by other labor movements or unions. Listen to learn more about the power of using technology to organize and the importance of management joining collective action.

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Chicks.square

Current Event September 10, 2014

Raising Antibiotic Free Chickens

Life Science Economics Health

Last week Perdue became the first major poultry company to eliminate the use of antibiotics in its chicken hatcheries. This step has public health advocates and consumers cheering because the use of antibiotics in meat production increases the risk that bacteria will evolve to be resistant to antibiotics, which could make it more difficult to treat humans. This public radio story takes you directly to a hatchery and explores the reasons Perdue made this decision. Listen to learn more about the use and elimination of antibiotics in meat production

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Current Event September 9, 2014

The Economics of Casino Gambling

Civics/Government Economics

Atlantic City, New Jersey was once the only place to gamble on the East Coast. This monopoly is over, as other states have opened or planned to build casinos. Atlantic City and its residents are feeling the negative impacts of a more competitive gambling market. In today’s public radio story casino workers and public officials reflect on these changes and look forward to what is next for Atlantic City.

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Schoolsupplies.square

Current Event September 3, 2014

Back to School Shopping

Economics Technology Education

This back-to-school season parents and economists alike are shocked by the costs associated with preparing students for school. Schools are increasingly asking families to buy supplies for the classroom and school, as well as personalized technology. The additional costs have some questioning whether it is reasonable. Listen to this public radio story to learn more about how families and schools are adjusting to increased technological costs.

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Bus.square

Current Event September 1, 2014

The Economics of an Early School Day

Civics/Government Economics Education

High School students often begin class between 7 and 8 a.m. despite medical recommendations that schools start later to give student more time to sleep. The negative effects of sleep deprivation, including lower academic performance, has pushed some experts to argue that this is one of the least expensive ways to increase student performance. However, efforts to push back start times have a big roadblock: bus schedules. Listen to today’s public radio story to learn more about why the economics of an earlier school day might not work.

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Classroom.square

Current Event August 29, 2014

Designing the School of the Future

Economics Education

Schools haven’t changed much in the last hundred years but as more schools embrace digital tools in the classroom, the traditional school building is likely to change. Today’s public radio story examines what the school of the future might look like. And designers are predicting that more flexible school spaces will cost less money to build.

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Current Event August 27, 2014

Getting It Fast: The Instant Economy

Economics Psychology

Sometimes you want what you want when you want it, and you will pay to get it quickly. This desire combined with smart phone and GPS technology has created a booming market of services that enable their users to get what they want, when they want it. The instant gratification these services enable has created an “Instant gratification economy” that changes the way people interact with the world and the way people work. Listen to learn more about these services and their impact.

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Detroit small

Current Event August 12, 2014

Is Water a Basic Human Right? Water Shut Offs in Detroit Spark Protests

Economics US History II

Detroit's water department is going after past due bills by shutting of thousands of customers who haven't paid their water bills. Residents are responding by protesting saying that water is a basic human right. And they are turning to the internet to find ways to illegally turn the water back on. Listen to this story to learn the impact of water shut-offs.

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Gaza small

Current Event August 12, 2014

Water Plays Crucial Role in Israeli Palestinian Conflict

Economics World History II

Gaza is in the middle of a conflict with Israel. The fighting is weighing heavily on daily life in Gaza. Water has always been hard to get, but its even more difficult now that the price of water is going up because of the conflict. Gaza relies on electricity to desalinize their water and power is also a scarce resource during this conflict. Listen to this radio story to learn more.

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Newyork small

Current Event August 7, 2014

A Luxury High Rise Segregates by Class with a "Poor Door"

Economics

A developer in New York is drawing criticism because he's building a skyscraper for residential housing that will have two different entrances. One will be for the tenants in the high priced condos, the other for low income subsidized housing residents. The so called "poor door" is raising complaints of segregation and inequality. Listen to this radio story to find out why.

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Weather small

Current Event August 6, 2014

Should You Carry an Umbrella With a Small Probability of Rain?

Economics Earth and Space Science Weather and Climate

What does a 20% chance of rain mean to you? For people around the country, it can mean many different things. So weather forecasters and meteorologists are trying to be more careful with their words to explain probability in weather predictions. Listen to this public radio story to learn how.

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Doctor small

Current Event July 31, 2014

Why Doctors Use Probability and Play with Risk Over Time

Economics Mathematics

Many people make decisions based on the probability of a specific outcome. Every day, doctors have to decide to base their health care decisions on probability. Listen to this public radio story about how a man's health care choice went against probability.

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Obseity

Current Event July 10, 2014

Companies Walk "Thin" Line Between Encouraging Healthy Behavior and Interfering

Economics

As healthcare costs rise and obesity becomes a national problem, companies look for innovative ways to encourage employees to stay thin and healthy at work. But some have gone overboard and employees complain they are interfering with their freedoms. Listen to this public radio story to learn what compares are doing to try to control their health care costs.

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Cuba depends on tourism

Current Event July 9, 2014

Cuba Depends on Tourism to Support Rocky Economy

Economics World History II

Tourism in Cuba makes up 10% of the island nation's gross domestic product. If America ever lifts its ban on travel to Cuba, its expected there could be a surge of at least a million Americans visiting. But tourism also brings wage disparity to the Communist country. Those who work in the tourism industry earn much more than other professions. Listen to this public radio story to learn why tourism is important to Cuba's survival.

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