Topic: Education

Current Event February 11, 2020

Love Poems from Kids

Education Poetry Creative Writing

Poetry allows writers to express deep thoughts and feelings. In the classroom, it can strengthen bonds between teachers and students by helping them get to know each other better. For Valentine’s Day, poet Kwame Alexander asked teachers around the country to challenge their students to write poems about love. Listen to hear the whimsical, poetic, and practical responses of students of all ages to the prompt, “Love is…”

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Current Event February 7, 2020

Debate: Should Everyone Use the Same Textbooks?

Politics Education U.S. History Censorship

Students around the country may learn different versions of U.S. history depending on where they live. Textbook publishers often customize textbooks for different states in response to political pressure, covering specific topics differently. Some say that this is important because different regions have different populations and different priorities. Others believe that all students in the country should have access to the same information and that variations in textbook content contributes to deepening the political divide. Listen to hear more about how textbooks differ from state to state and then debate: Should everyone use the same textbooks?

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Current Event February 3, 2020

Prayer in School

Education Religion Law U.S. Constitution

President Trump is taking steps to remind students and teachers of their right to pray in school. Under the Constitution, students have a right to freely practice their religion. However, the Constitution also says that public schools may not promote any religion. Listen to learn which religious expressions are allowed in public schools and how the law aims to prevent discrimination on the basis of religion.

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Current Event January 17, 2020

Debate: Should College Admissions Use the SAT and ACT Tests?

Race Education Class

Students sued the University of California to force it to stop requiring applicants to submit standardized test scores. The complaint claims tests like the SAT and ACT are biased against low-income and non-white applicants, and scores are closely linked to family income. Defenders of the tests say they are the most objective way to evaluate skills and point to other countries that rely heavily on testing while producing high-achieving students. Listen to hear more about the lawsuit and then debate: Should college admissions use the SAT and ACT tests?

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Current Event January 9, 2020

Inclusive Programs Support Students with Autism

Technology Education Learning Human Behavior

Gifted autistic teens can have trouble finding summer programs that push them academically while also supporting their particular social needs. The University of Iowa’s College of Education summer program welcomes teens with autism spectrum disorder and provides the social and academic supports necessary for students to explore advanced subjects in math, science, and the arts. Listen to hear teens with autism spectrum disorder describe their experiences and how this unique summer program has made a difference in their lives.

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Current Event January 3, 2020

Using the Scientific Method to Win a Hot Dog Toss

Education Motion

It’s official: A team of students from MIT can toss a hotdog farther than anyone else in the world. The young scientists recently beat the existing Guinness world record in the hotdog throw, a title once held by an NFL quarterback. To prepare for competition, the group systematically tested different throwing techniques, cooking methods, and types of wieners. Listen to hear a STEM student explain what motivated her to take on the challenge and how her team’s scientific approach helped lead them to victory.

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Current Event December 19, 2019

Support for First Generation College Students

Education Class

Students who are the first in their families to attend college face unique challenges. They often feel like outsiders, unfamiliar with common campus practices like “office hours” and unsure how to navigate college life. Their sense of isolation leads many “first-gen” students to drop out of college. One small private college is taking steps to help these vulnerable students adjust to campus life and graduate on time. Listen to learn how role-playing, free lunches, and a list of first-gen employees on campus help first-gen college students succeed.

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Current Event December 13, 2019

Debate: Should Free Speech Be Protected on College Campuses?

Race Education Gender Protest U.S. Constitution

Incidents involving racist, sexist, anti-Semitic, and homophobic speech are on the rise on college campuses throughout the U.S. But the First Amendment protects free speech, and colleges want to create spaces where students and professors can explore all kinds of ideas, even potentially offensive ones. Listen to learn about the recent rash of hate crimes at one college and a professor’s inflammatory comments at another, and then debate: Should free speech be protected on college campuses?

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Current Event November 27, 2019

Learning to Manage Money

Education Finance

How much allowance money do kids typically get these days? A group of accountants recently conducted a survey to learn the current going rate for kids’ pocket money. They also asked parents whether kids have to do chores for their allowances and polled kids on their savings habits. One expert called the survey results “a shocker.” Listen to learn more about what the expert thinks kids should be learning about managing money and how families can help.

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Current Event November 21, 2019

Student Loan Debt Grows

Education

Some students are questioning whether the rising cost of a college degree is worth it. As the government reduces funding to public colleges, students and families are paying more. Many students graduate with crushing debt that limits their future choices. At the same time, the earning potential of college graduates compared to non-graduates has continued to climb, making a college education seem more important than ever. Listen to hear financial planning experts explain the pros and cons of a college education and ways to make college more affordable.

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Current Event November 7, 2019

Books on Instagram

Technology Education Media

"Alice in Wonderland" is now on Instagram. Social media fans can find five works of literature, including the classic novel by Lewis Carroll, on their social media feeds. The New York Public Library has posted multimedia versions of the works through its new Insta Novel project. By combining the fun and appeal of social media with popular novels and poems, the library hopes to attract new readers. Listen to hear a blogger describe her experience with "Alice" online, and discover how it lined up with the aims of the Insta Novel creators.

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Current Event October 22, 2019

Race-Conscious Admissions Allowed at Harvard

Race Education Law

A Boston judge ruled that Harvard University’s admissions process is legal. Harvard had been sued by a group claiming the university discriminated against Asian-American applicants when deciding whether to admit them. The judge ruled that Harvard’s process was fair because it considers many other factors when admitting students, and affirmative action allows the university to ensure a diverse student body. Listen to learn how a ruling for Harvard could affect schools throughout the country and why the legal battle over using race in college admissions continues.

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Current Event October 3, 2019

Cheating in College

Education Culture Ethics Business

College students overwhelmed by challenging assignments and deadlines are turning to a growing industry for help: essay writing companies. These companies produce original papers written by ghostwriters that students buy and submit as their own. Colleges are trying new technologies to prevent cheating and also working to change campus culture. Listen to hear students, teachers and experts discuss the problem of cheating on college campuses and how to combat it.

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Current Event September 20, 2019

Debate: Should Student Communication Be Monitored?

Technology Education Violence

In response to mass shootings, many schools are turning to new technologies to help keep their campuses safe. There are a variety of systems that can monitor students’ communication and behavior and detect indicators of potential violence. However, some argue that these technologies violate students’ privacy rights and civil liberties. Listen to learn more about this complex issue and then debate: Should student communication be monitored?

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Current Event September 19, 2019

4 Day School Week

Education Reform

Some school districts are exploring a new approach to saving money and improving educational outcomes: 4-day school weeks. Both urban and rural school districts throughout Colorado are trying out 4-day school weeks and observing how the change is impacting budgets, teacher retention, and student achievement. Listen to learn about the logic behind the 4-day school week and how this schedule has affected Colorado schools so far.

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ELA

The Power of Example

Race Education Class Perseverance

A 29-year-old single mother of three children recently graduated from Montana State University. She faced numerous challenges in earning her degree, but setting a good example for her children helped motivate her to persist. In this interview, she discusses how and why she earned her college degree. Listen to hear her inspirational story, learn her advice for other “nontraditional” college students, and find out what is next for this new college graduate.

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ELA

A Legacy of Generosity

Race Education Violence Facing Adversity Human Connection

In 2016, a police officer shot and killed an African American man named Philando Castile at a traffic stop. Castile’s girlfriend published videos of the incident online, and it received national attention. Castile was a beloved school cafeteria worker who made a positive impact on the students he encountered. In honor of her son’s memory, Castile’s mother created the Philando Castile Relief Foundation. Listen to hear about how he connected with students and find out how the foundation is working to carry on Castile’s legacy of generosity toward the students he served.

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Current Event September 5, 2019

Solar Energy in Communities of Color

Race Technology Education Energy Conservation

Renewable energy sources like solar power can help protect the environment and lower people’s electricity bills. Unfortunately, not everyone is benefitting equally from alternative energy sources and the technologies that harness them. One African-American solar technology professional is trying to reverse this trend. Listen to learn how he is bringing renewable energy to communities of color in Nashville and why this goal is so important to him.

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Current Event August 28, 2019

Preschool Predicts Multi-generational Success

Education Psychology Class Learning Neuroscience Development

Many decades ago, children from poor families participated in an early childhood educational program known as the Perry Preschool Project aimed at improving the children’s academic achievement. While the program did not have the effect that the researchers anticipated, it did have a positive impact on their lives and on future generations. Listen to learn about the long-term effects of the Perry Preschool Project and how this study may shift the way we prepare students for success.

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Current Event June 17, 2019

Valedictorian Speech Causes Controversy

Politics Education Protest Censorship

While giving her valedictorian speech at her graduation, a Texas high school student was cut off before finishing. School administrators had asked the student to remove what they believed were controversial elements in her speech, but she chose not to do that. Listen to hear more about what the student felt was important to include in her speech, despite the school’s objections, and why.

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