All Social Studies

Current Event January 19, 2021

Trump Is Impeached for the Second Time

Politics Democracy U.S. Constitution Branches of Government

A week after the attack on the U.S. Capitol, President Trump was impeached by the House of Representatives for inciting an insurrection, which is a violent uprising against the government. He is the only president in U.S. history to be impeached twice. Ten Republican lawmakers joined Democrats in voting to impeach Trump, indicating more bipartisanship than his last impeachment garnered. The process now moves to the Senate for a trial, although that will not occur until after President-elect Joe Biden takes office. Listen to hear the voices of lawmakers arguing for and against impeachment and reporters considering what might happen next.

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Current Event January 25, 2021

Biden Is Inaugurated 46th President of the U.S.

Politics Civics/Government

Joseph Biden was sworn in as America’s 46th president on January 20, 2021. The inauguration ceremony took place at the U.S. Capitol, two weeks after violent extremists stormed the building in an effort to overturn the election. Vice-president Kamala Harris also took the oath of office, making history by becoming the first female vice-president and also the first Black and Asian American. Biden and Harris take office as the country faces extraordinary challenges, including a worldwide pandemic and a deeply divided nation. Listen to hear more about an historic event and how it differed from past inaugurations.

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Current Event January 26, 2021

Understanding Coronavirus Mutation

Health Medicine

A new strain of coronavirus is spreading in the U.S. New versions of the virus are constantly developing from mutations, or slight genetic changes that occur as the original virus copies itself inside the human body. The new variant, which originated in the U.K., is more contagious than the original, raising concerns that infections could increase quickly in the U.S. and other countries as well. Listen to learn how the new strain may be causing infections to spread more easily and what scientists say is the best way to stay safe.

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Current Event February 19, 2016

Debate: Free or Paid Internet

Technology

Most of the 1.3 billion people in India have no way to go online. Facebook has offered a free version of the internet to users in India, with selected apps. Since only selected content is free, India has prohibited this access. It upholds the principle of net neutrality, that the Web is open and prioritizes no service over another. The government of India doesn't want Facebook to be the gatekeeper of content and says people should be allowed to select their own content. Others say free service for the poor should be pursued. Listen to this story and debate with your students: Should the Internet be free or paid?

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Current Event January 24, 2021

Weird News: Jewelry Store Owner Holds Treasure Hunt

Community Entertainment Mystery

Listen to hear about a jeweler’s giant treasure hunt in Michigan.

Vocabulary: dramatically, participate

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Current Event January 22, 2021

Debate: Is Big Tech Too Big?

Technology politics

Following the attack on the U.S. Capitol, big tech companies have taken action. Facebook and Twitter shut down the social media accounts of thousands of people involved in the attack, including President Trump, who has been impeached for inciting insurrection. Some say big tech companies have grown too powerful, and should not be able to restrict speech or business transactions. Others point out that private companies have the right to make and enforce their own rules for participation on their sites. Listen to learn more about the power of online giants and then debate: Is big tech too big?

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Current Event January 17, 2021

Weird News: Big Tip for No Service

Health Culture Community

Listen to hear about a coffee shop barista who was generously rewarded for his efforts.

Vocabulary: shame, haul

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Current Event January 21, 2021

Teen Develops Diabetes Management App

Technology Health

A teen diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes created an app to help himself and others manage the disease. Thirteen-year-old Drew Mendelow felt overwhelmed by all the data he had to keep track of as a diabetes patient, like food intake and blood sugar levels. He designed an app to help him, and he’s sharing it with as many other patients as he can. Listen to hear how a teen entrepreneur took action to manage his illness and help others, and learn why one medical professional thinks his efforts will make a positive difference.

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Current Event January 20, 2021

College Athlete Makes History for Women

Gender Sports

As a successful college soccer player, Sarah Fuller knows how to kick. So when her university’s football team needed a kicker for an upcoming game, she stepped in, making history as the first female athlete to play in a Big Five NCAA football game. Before that, Fuller had spent years struggling to overcome injuries. Listen to hear a groundbreaking athlete explain how it felt to join the football team, why she was emotional on game day, and who most inspires her.

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Current Event January 15, 2021

Debate: Should Breakdancing be an Olympic Sport?

Culture Sports

Breakdancing is the latest sport to be added to the Olympic games. Breaking is an athletic dance style incorporating acrobatics, dance moves, and freestyle footwork. It was first performed on New York City streets in the 1970s, typically to hip hop music. Some say becoming an Olympic sport could cause breaking to lose its character as it moves farther away from its urban roots. But it might also inspire a new generation of young breakers. Listen to hear a veteran breakdancer’s response and then debate: Should breakdancing become an Olympic sport?

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Current Event January 14, 2021

The Meaning of Sedition

Politics Law Protest Violence

Rioters who stormed the U.S. Capitol could be charged with sedition, or an attempt to “overthrow, put down, or destroy the government by force.” The mob attacked legislators as they were carrying out a fundamental duty of American democracy: certifying the electoral votes confirming the country’s next president. Although sedition is hard to prove in court, some say that holding violent extremists responsible for their actions will help prevent future attacks. Listen to learn more about the meaning of sedition and how it has been used in the past to prosecute terrorism.

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