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Current Events

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March 18, 2020

2:31

Ninja Peacock Takeover

Peacocks are pestering residents of an historic neighborhood in Miami, Florida. It’s mating season, and the male birds are trying to attract attention by showing their feathers, screeching loudly, tearing into flowers, and attacking cars. Some residents admire the birds’ beauty while others complain about noise and damaged property. Listen to learn what the town is doing to solve the peacock problem and why one man compared the birds to ninjas.

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March 17, 2020

3:18

Schools Closing Around the Country

Leaders in over 30 states have closed schools statewide to help contain the spread of COVID-19, the disease caused by the novel coronavirus. Millions of students will be home, and parents and guardians are scrambling to find child care. Children from low-income families who rely on free or reduced-price lunches, and parents who are unable to stay home from work, will face particular challenges. Listen to learn why schools are closing for long periods of time and what politicians are doing to help people affected by the virus.

This audio story was recorded in mid-March. The news about COVID-19 is changing rapidly and parts of this story may be dated.

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March 17, 2020

3:16

Coronavirus Explained for Kids

The new coronavirus is a highly infectious disease that is spreading rapidly around the world. The virus causes mild symptoms for many people, like those of the common cold, but it affects others more seriously. The new coronavirus is very contagious, and public health experts are trying to better understand it and control the global outbreak. Listen to hear about the effects of the virus and what people can do to slow its spread.

This audio story was recorded in mid-February. The news about COVID-19 is changing rapidly and parts of this story may be dated.

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March 16, 2020

:26

Weird News: Disney's Sword Pulled from the Stone

Listen to hear a story about a man whose Disneyland adventure was fit for a king.

Vocabulary: display, plaque, hail, brute

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March 16, 2020

4:32

Flattening the Curve of Infection's Spread

COVID-19 has officially been declared a pandemic, a disease infecting populations throughout the world. The virus spreads easily, and once a few people have it, they can quickly infect many others with whom they have contact. A graph of the infection’s spread shows a sharp peak when the rate of infection is highest. As schools close, more people work from home, and other steps are taken to limit human interaction, scientists expect the rate of infection to slow down and the graph’s curve to flatten. Listen to learn how flattening the curve can help the health care system handle the COVID-19 outbreak, and how past epidemics can help guide today’s decisions about how to respond.

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March 13, 2020

3:57

Debate: Should Cashless Businesses Be Allowed?

Many stores have recently gone cashless, requiring shoppers to pay for their purchases with a credit card or digital app. These business owners say security is better without cash on hand, and check-out lines move faster. But not everyone has a credit card, say opponents, who claim that the policy discriminates against low-income shoppers. Several big cities have now banned cashless businesses in response to complaints. Listen to hear more about the pros and cons of a cashless economy and then debate: Should cashless businesses be allowed?

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March 12, 2020

2:56

Drive-Through Coronavirus Testing

Health care workers at a Seattle hospital can now drive their cars up to a window to be tested for COVID-19. Washington state has been one of the places hardest hit by COVID-19, an illness caused by a new coronavirus, and the city hopes to protect health workers who are essential to keeping the virus contained. Listen to learn how coronavirus testing is done and why drive-through test sites are considered safer than traditional clinics.

This audio story was recorded in early March. The news about COVID-19 is changing rapidly and parts of this story may be dated.

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March 11, 2020

2:29

The Warming Earth

The earth is getting warmer. Records kept for the past century show a steady increase in temperature each decade, and 2019 was the second hottest year ever. As humans send carbon dioxide into the air from cars, factories, and other sources, the trapped heat warms the planet, causing glacial ice to melt, oceans to rise, and big weather events like floods and droughts to increase in intensity. Listen to learn more about changes to the earth caused by global warming and what to expect in the future.

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March 10, 2020

5:05

American Teacher Stuck in China

Authorities have locked down the city of Wuhan, China, where the first cases of the highly contagious coronavirus were found. Wuhan residents need to stay in their homes at all times and receive food and other supplies by delivery. Even foreigners cannot leave, since many airlines have suspended flights to and from China. Listen to hear an American teacher in Wuhan describe her daily routine and how she copes with the isolation of life under quarantine.

This audio story was recorded in late February. The news about COVID-19 is changing rapidly and parts of this story may be dated.

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March 9, 2020

:26

Weird News: Chance of Falling Iguanas

Listen to hear about why iguanas were falling from the sky in southern Florida.

Vocabulary: uncommon, tumble, advice, slumber

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March 9, 2020

3:38

War Powers Act and Iran

The House of Representatives voted to require the President to get permission from Congress for any further military action against Iran. The move is a response to the Trump administration’s recent killing of a top Iranian general and other aggressive acts. Lawmakers who support the resolution say the U.S. Constitution gives Congress the power to declare war against a foreign power. The President, however, believes that laws passed after 9/11 give him the authority to act alone when the U.S. is threatened. Listen to learn more about the struggle between Congress and the President over war powers.

Note: After the publication of this story, the Senate approved a measure to block President Trump from further attacks on Iran without consulting Congress.

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March 6, 2020

3:51

Debate: Are Caucuses or Primaries More Democratic?

Caucuses and primaries are two different ways of allowing voters to choose their party’s presidential nominee. The caucus system requires citizens to gather together for discussion and debate before casting their vote. Some prize the highly democratic nature of caucuses, where people meet face-to-face to discuss political issues. But others say caucuses discourage participation since they demand so much time and energy. Most states have opted for primaries, a simpler system of voting at a ballot box. Listen to hear more about the pros and cons of each method of voting and then debate: Are caucuses or primaries more democratic?

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March 5, 2020

6:02

Avoiding Coronavirus

A new, highly contagious virus is spreading quickly, prompting many people to wonder how they can protect themselves. COVID-19, an illness caused by a new strand of coronavirus, spreads through tiny droplets sent into the air when an infected person coughs or sneezes. Experts say simple measures like hand washing and avoiding handshakes can help prevent illness. Listen to a science reporter explain how Americans can prepare for a possible outbreak of COVID-19 in their communities and what individuals can do to keep themselves healthy.

This audio story was recorded in early March. The news about COVID-19 is changing rapidly and parts of this story may be dated.

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March 4, 2020

3:44

When Noises Drive You Crazy

For years, doctors struggled to diagnose an unusual set of symptoms: feeling angry or upset when hearing certain noises. Now scientists have identified the condition, misophonia, and doctors and patients are finally learning more about it. People with misophonia are highly sensitive to a range of everyday sounds like chewing and sniffling. They can experience extreme stress, making events like sharing a family meal challenging. Listen to hear a misophonic person describe what it feels like to hear chewing noises and why those suffering from misophonia and their families are relieved that the condition has been named.

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March 3, 2020

3:42

Crossing the Southern Border for College

The high cost of college in California is prompting students to cross the Mexican border in search of affordable options. CETYS, a private university with campuses in three Mexican border towns, currently enrolls over 300 California students. Many live at home and make the short commute across the border each day. Listen to hear CETYS students explain what drew them south for college and how their American friends and family reacted.

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March 2, 2020

3:56

Racist Violence Declared High Priority for FBI

The FBI announced it is moving racist violence to the same threat level as foreign terrorism. The change comes in response to a nationwide rise in racially motivated crimes, including attacks on blacks, Jews, Latinos, and other minority groups. To combat the trend, the FBI director instructed his special investigative teams to keep their eyes on domestic terrorism, and they have already arrested seven members of a violent neo-Nazi group. Listen to learn more about the FBI’s crackdown on domestic threats and why some people question whether the move will make a difference.

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March 2, 2020

:32

Weird News: Thieves Return Stolen Boulder

Listen to hear about the mysterious disappearance of a special stone.

Vocabulary: baffled, precious, boulder, heist

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February 28, 2020

3:09

Debate: Should Self-Driving Cars Be Charged for Idle Time?

Fleets of self-driving cars may hit city streets soon, ready to give pedestrians a lift when they need it. But where will the cars wait to be called? To avoid parking fees, experts say driverless cars may circle slowly or even turn deliberately into heavy traffic, clogging city and residential roads and wasting fuel. To discourage this behavior, some have suggested charging cars not just for parking, but for the time they spend on the road. Listen to learn why some people favor “congestion pricing” and then debate: Should self-driving cars be charged for idle time?

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February 27, 2020

3:54

Black Representation in Literature

For Black History Month, a major bookseller placed “Diverse Editions” on its shelves with classic books by white authors featuring black faces on the covers. The bookstore says it hoped the covers would help to engage new audiences in classics like The Wizard of Oz, Frankenstein, and Romeo and Juliet. However, the action sparked outrage among many who say the bookseller is cashing in on Black History Month without truly honoring black authors. Listen to hear a writer explain why she considers the move to be “literary blackface” and what bookstores can do to support diversity.

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February 26, 2020

2:19

Remembering Africa's Favorite Elephant

A beloved elephant in Kenya has died. Tim was one of the few remaining “tuskers,” elephants with big, fully developed tusks. His dramatic good looks and willingness to pose beautifully for wildlife photographers made Tim an international celebrity. He lived a long life and died of natural causes, a surprising fact since many African elephants are poached, or killed illegally, for their tusks when they are young. Listen to learn why local farmers feared Tim and how wildlife scientists helped them learn to appreciate him.

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February 25, 2020

4:00

Connecting Through Art at the Border

An interactive art installation with giant lights and booming loudspeakers is helping people communicate across the U.S.-Mexico border. Visitors to the exhibit on both sides of the border are invited to send searchlights into the sky and when they intersect, a conversation can begin. Americans and Mexicans are using the opportunity to chat, sing, and even celebrate birthdays together. Listen to hear visitors describe the effect of speaking to neighbors across a border wall and why the artist calls his creation a “bridge.”

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February 24, 2020

4:09

Bats and Coronavirus

Where did the new coronavirus start? Scientists believe the highly contagious virus spreading quickly among humans probably originated with bats. Bats’ amazing immune systems allow them to carry viruses without getting sick themselves. Just as with past viral outbreaks like SARS and MERS, scientists believe bats infected other animals with coronavirus, and those animals then passed it to humans. Listen to learn more about the origin of coronavirus and why scientists believe studying bats could unlock secrets about fighting disease.

This audio story was recorded in early February. The news about COVID-19 is changing rapidly and parts of this story may be dated.

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February 24, 2020

:26

Weird News: Space Cookies

Listen to hear about a batch of chocolate-chip cookies sent from outer space.

Vocabulary: cargo, capsule, orbit, experiment

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February 21, 2020

5:31

Debate: Should You Read the Book Before You Watch the Movie?

Filmmakers often make movies based on popular and beloved books, prompting audiences to wonder whether to read the book or watch the movie first. The argument has been made that movie adaptations can broaden the audience for books, especially older classics. Another view is that people who see the movie version of a book first will miss out on the benefit of fully engaging their imaginations while reading. Listen to hear a discussion about popular books and movies that raises points on both sides and then debate: Should you read the book before you watch the movie?

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February 20, 2020

4:26

Esports Explosion

Several universities are offering students the chance to major in a subject unheard of just a few years ago: competitive video gaming, or esports. Esports have gained a huge following in recent years, allowing athletes to earn money through sponsorships, merchandise, and tournament winnings. Fans watch games not only online, but also at arenas that can draw thousands of enthusiastic spectators. Listen to hear how schools are preparing students for careers in this growing field and how some people are working to make esports more inclusive.

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February 19, 2020

2:22

"Going Viral" Exhibit

An exhibit at a Philadelphia museum explores how ideas about infection have changed over two thousand years. “Going Viral” examines early views of illness, when people believed body fluids like blood and snot regulated the body, and helps visitors understand the devastation brought by epidemics like the Black Death and Spanish flu. It even demonstrates through an interactive display how germs might spread on a modern-day subway. Listen to hear more about the exhibit and what museum curators hope visitors will learn from it.

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February 18, 2020

3:24

Britain Leaves the European Union

The United Kingdom (UK), which includes England, Scotland, Wales, and Northern Ireland, has officially left the European Union (EU), a partnership of 28 countries promoting peace and economic cooperation. Since the vote to exit the EU in 2016, known as “Brexit,” British leaders and citizens have struggled to determine what the move will mean for their economy and way of life, including the freedom to work and travel easily throughout Europe. Listen to hear what Prime Minister Boris Johnson says about Brexit now that it has finally happened, and why Brits across the country are reacting with glee, dismay, and calls for action.

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February 17, 2020

:27

Weird News: Cat's Great Escape

Listen to this story about a cat who is famous for his ability to escape.

Vocabulary: agenda, contained

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February 14, 2020

2:25

Debate: Should College Admissions Include Adversity Scores?

The College Board has dropped the practice of assigning an “adversity score” to college applicants taking the SAT exam due to objections from parents and students. The score was intended to provide college admissions offices with information about economic hardships faced by students. Supporters of the score say it can help colleges understand the challenges faced by low-income applicants compared to their more affluent peers. Opponents argue the score cannot capture the complexities of people’s experience and might be used against poor students. Listen to hear arguments on both sides and then debate: Should college admissions include adversity scores?

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February 13, 2020

4:05

Containing the Coronavirus Outbreak

The World Health Organization and the U.S. government are taking action to keep a new contagious virus from spreading. The coronavirus is transmitted by air and can quickly infect large populations. To help prevent its spread, the U.S. government is restricting travel to and from China, where the outbreak began, and putting some travelers in quarantine, which means separating them from other people for a few weeks. Listen to learn how this virus compares to others, where it has already spread, and how the government plans to contain it.

This audio story was recorded in early February. The news about COVID-19 is changing rapidly and parts of this story may be dated.

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February 12, 2020

3:24

Chasing Snowstorms

A new NASA study is looking for ways to predict snowstorms more accurately. Weather forecasters can tell when a snowstorm is approaching, but they cannot predict how heavily the snow will fall. To help improve forecasts, the study is sending aircraft directly into the center of storms to gather information. Listen to hear a NASA scientist explain what they are looking for and how the data they collect will help forecasters make better predictions.

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February 11, 2020

6:55

Love Poems from Kids

Poetry allows writers to express deep thoughts and feelings. In the classroom, it can strengthen bonds between teachers and students by helping them get to know each other better. For Valentine’s Day, poet Kwame Alexander asked teachers around the country to challenge their students to write poems about love. Listen to hear the whimsical, poetic, and practical responses of students of all ages to the prompt, “Love is…”

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February 10, 2020

:26

Weird News: Stuffed Animal Lost for 14 Years

Listen to this story about an 18-year-old girl who discovers her long-lost stuffed animal that was missing for 14 years.

Vocabulary: intact

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February 10, 2020

5:01

President Donald Trump Is Acquitted in Impeachment Trial

The Senate voted to acquit President Trump of charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The House of Representatives had impeached the president on these violations in December, but the Senate’s decision means he will not be removed from office. Senators cast votes along party lines, with the exception of Senator Mitt Romney of Utah, who was the first senator to vote to convict a president in his own party. Listen to hear how Romney came to his decision and how Congress plans to move forward after an exhausting and divisive impeachment trial.

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February 7, 2020

3:40

Debate: Should Everyone Use the Same Textbooks?

Students around the country may learn different versions of U.S. history depending on where they live. Textbook publishers often customize textbooks for different states in response to political pressure, covering specific topics differently. Some say that this is important because different regions have different populations and different priorities. Others believe that all students in the country should have access to the same information and that variations in textbook content contributes to deepening the political divide. Listen to hear more about how textbooks differ from state to state and then debate: Should everyone use the same textbooks?

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February 6, 2020

4:25

Asian Americans in Film

More Hollywood films featuring Asian Americans are being made, with some hitting it big at the box office. According to one producer, the trend signals a change in the way Asian Americans are perceived and accepted by mainstream culture. Listen to hear a YouTube channel producer explain how digital media helps minority artists break through, and what the success of Awkwafina means for other Asian American performers.

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February 5, 2020

4:27

Counting Dog Years

Scientists have developed a new, more accurate way to count a dog’s age in human years. Until now, people have generally believed that one year in a dog’s life equals seven years of human life. But when scientists compared chemical marks on dog and human DNA to see where they matched, they found surprising results about the relationship between dog and human ages. Listen to hear a scientist explain how the new technique works and what the research on canine aging means for dogs and their human friends.

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February 4, 2020

3:35

Impact of Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric on Hispanic Kids

A new study finds that Latino youth face higher rates of depression than their black and white peers. The results reflect a range of problems Latinos in America are facing, including discrimination, violence, and for some, fear of deportation. Listen to hear a Latina teen explain how hateful words affect her and what she is doing to combat her sadness and anger.

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February 3, 2020

3:54

Prayer in School

President Trump is taking steps to remind students and teachers of their right to pray in school. Under the Constitution, students have a right to freely practice their religion. However, the Constitution also says that public schools may not promote any religion. Listen to learn which religious expressions are allowed in public schools and how the law aims to prevent discrimination on the basis of religion.

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February 3, 2020

:27

Weird News: Beekeeper Police Unit

Listen to learn about the special beekeeping unit of the New York Police Department.

Vocabulary: deployed, expertise, extract

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