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June 25, 2014

4:20

Facebook ed

How Dangerous are Threatening Statements on Facebook?

The Supreme Court is weighing in on threats posted on Facebook. So far courts have ruled threatening statements made on Facebook, including death threats, are true threats and punishable. Facebook says that they’re looking for conflict resolution strategies instead of always going straight to the authorities when they spot threats. Listen to this audio story to learn about threat made on social media.

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June 24, 2014

3:21

Last of navajo code talkers dies at 93  navajo language in jeopardy

Last of Navajo Code Talkers Dies at 93, Navajo Language in Jeopardy

The last of World War II’s Navajo Code Talkers died at 93 years old. Americans collaborated with the Native American Navajo tribe to create a code that was unbreakable to Japanese forces during WWII. Today, the Navajo fear their language will die out. Listen to this public radio story to learn why.

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June 23, 2014

7:23

Could collecting animals for science be hurting some endangered species

Could Collecting Animals for Science be Hurting Some Endangered Species?

A new research article has ruffled the feathers of some scientists. The study questions whether it’s damaging endangered populations of birds and other species to collect them for scientific study. Many scientists see the collection of rare animals as a way to discover diseases and understand the past, while some ethicists see collection as a threat to small endangered animal populations. Listen to this audio story to learn more.

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June 19, 2014

7:11

Second amendment up for debate

Second Amendment Up for Debate Since its Inception

The Second Amendment is only one sentence long. It allows for individuals to own and use guns. But since its inception, the meaning has been debated. There is still no public consensus around its meaning. Listen to this public radio story to learn more.

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June 18, 2014

4:59

Sexism in storm names

Sexism in Storm Names - Gender Makes a Difference

Studies show that people react differently to male and female named storms. There is more preparation and fear of storms with male names, such as Victor, versus a storm named Christina. As a result, there are serious implications of this unconscious gender bias. Listen to this audio story to learn more.

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June 17, 2014

5:43

Rising

Rising Numbers of Minors Crossing the Border Shows Holes in Immigration System

The number of unaccompanied minors crossing the Mexican-American border has increased dramatically and sources say that it's due to a failing immigration system. Although a large number of children are found by border patrol, many evade authorities and cross into a country by themselves. Listen to this public radio story to learn what happens to them.

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June 16, 2014

6:53

40 years later

40 Years Later, "All the President's Men" Authors Reflect on Questions for Nixon

It has been 40 years since the publication of "All the President's Men" by Washington Post reporters, Bob Woodward and Carl Bernstein. The popular book was made into a movie at the same time. The authors of the book recently reflected on their reporting that revealed President Richard Nixon was trying to rig his re-election campaign. Listen to this radio story to teach your students about Watergate and its place in history.

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June 15, 2014

4:10

Jessica ahlquist.square

Protesting Prayer in Public School

School sponsored prayer was outlawed by the U.S. Supreme Court in 1963. The case that led to this decision began in November 1956 when a 16-year-old schoolboy protested his public school’s mandatory prayer and Bible reading period by reading silently from the Koran and refusing to stand for the Lord’s Prayer. This simple act of resistance led to a huge change in the way public schools interact with religion. In the early 1960s, 40% of school districts in the U.S. had mandatory Bible reading and prayer; it is now unconstitutional for any public school to sponsor prayer. However, there continue to be challenges regarding prayer and religion in public schools. In 2012, a Rhode Island teen complained about a prayer banner at her high school. Listen to learn how the community and courts responded to her challenge.

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June 13, 2014

4:01

Republican house leader loses seat

Republican House Leader Loses Seat to Challenger Because of Immigration Reform

In a surprise upset, Republican House Leader Eric Cantor lost his re-election bid to a Tea Party-backed candidate. Political analysts say one of the reasons he lost was his moderate stand on immigration reform. Listen to this radio story to find out what this means for immigration reform.

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June 11, 2014

5:18

Some californians

Some Californians Want to Make Water Available to the Highest Bidder

California's drought is causing water prices to vary region to region. This makes some farmers want to sell their water—but they're worried that it might negatively affect their water allotment. Economists say the answer is a better engineered irrigation canal and use of the free market. Listen to this radio story to learn why.

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June 9, 2014

4:12

World cup brazil

Brazilians are Not Motivated to Celebrate the World Cup Due to Lack of Preparation

As the World Cup is about to start, local Brazilians are not motivated to celebrate and join the festivities due to a lack of preparation. Stadium seats are not fully tested for safety and locals are unhappy with the government for spending so much money on the sporting event. Some Brazilians are feeling embarrassed because they worry their country isn't going to delivery a world class World Cup. Listen to this radio story to learn why.

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June 9, 2014

Panama canal expansion slowed by arguments over funding

Panama Canal Expansion Slowed by Arguments Over Funding

The Panama Canal was built 100 years ago as a shortcut for maritime trading. Today, construction is underway to widen the canal so larger ships can pass through. With the wide canal, Panama hopes to become the Hong Kong of Latin America, but construction is often halted due to arguments over funding.

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June 8, 2014

4:54

Much ado quarto.square

Adapting Shakespeare’s ‘Much Ado About Nothing’

William Shakespeare’s play “Much Ado About Nothing” has been adapted for the stage and screen across history and across the globe. The plot of the play, written in 1598 and 1599, resonates across time and with many audiences. The most recent film adaptation by Josh Whedon in 2013 delighted critics and viewers alike. Listen to hear from Whedon himself why he loved “Much Ado About Nothing” and the impact he thinks the play has had on modern storytelling.

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June 8, 2014

3:43

12153041346 593096b65f k

The Bible in Public Schools

What role should religion have in public life and in government? These are the questions America’s founding fathers faced when drafting the constitution. And it’s a question that is still examined today. This First Amendment protects the free exercise of religion while preventing the establishment of religion. These competing ideas have created a constitutional conflict when individuals want to exercise their religion in places funded by the government, like public schools. Listen to learn how this line was tested when a 6-year-old student wanted his mother to read his favorite book, the Bible, to his class.

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June 6, 2014

4:32

Soldiers and villagers continue to celebrate d day 70 years later

Soldiers and Villagers Continue to Celebrate D-Day 70 Years Later

70 years after the Allies invaded Normandy to liberate France from Nazi control during WWII, many of the soldiers who stormed the beaches on D-Day are very old or no longer alive. But those who witnessed the invasion and the relatives of the soldiers continue to gather in the small village in France where it happened. Many soldiers stayed in contact with the same villagers they met during wartime. Listen to this audio story to learn about the commemoration.

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June 5, 2014

4:04

Congress upset with white house decision to do prisoner swap without consultation

Congress Upset with White House Decision to do Prisoner Swap Without Consultation

The White House recently swapped five Guantanamo prisoners for one U.S army sergeant who was a prisoner of war in Afghanistan. However, Congress is upset because the President didn't consult with them before making the trade. Some legislators feel that this event was designed to further the Obama Administration's legacy. Listen to this radio story to learn why.

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June 4, 2014

4:55

Cap and trade carbon emissions policy aimed at using the free market

Cap-and-Trade Carbon Emissions Policy Aimed at Using the Free Market

Cap and Trade is the new carbon emissions policy aimed at regulating emissions from various factories based on a "token" system. When an entity runs out of tokens, they can turn to the free market to buy more. This story clearly explains what Cap and Trade is and why Republicans don't like it. Listen to this radio story to learn why.

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June 3, 2014

4:24

More moms share baby photos on social media  changing moms' identities

More Moms Share Baby Photos on Social Media, Changing Moms' Identities

New moms are using Facebook and other social media sites to share pictures of their newborns in such numbers that it is creating an all digital generation. Studies showed that moms' increased use of social media represents their struggle with a changing identity and relationship with motherhood.

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June 3, 2014

5:50

Gwtw.tears.square

Bringing ‘Gone With The Wind’ to the Screen

The movie Gone With The Wind was released in 1939. This story of love and survival in the Civil War resonated with audiences and critics alike. It won 10 Academy Awards and when adjusted for inflation it remains the highest grossing movie ever. The story’s path from print to screen was not a quick or easy one. Listen to learn more about the film’s production and how a movie about the Civil War won the hearts and minds of people in 1939 and to this today.

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June 2, 2014

5:32

Looking back at beijing's tiananmen square protest  25 years later

Looking Back at Beijing's Tiananmen Square Protest, 25 Years Later

Twenty five years ago, a group of students in China dared to challenge the Communist government with protests in a major square in Beijing called Tiananmen Square. The protests were broken up by the military, who fired into the crowd. More than 300 people were estimated to have been killed. The government called the protests "counter-revolutionary." In the decades since the "Tiananmen Massacre," the government has worked to make the protest disappear from the minds of the Chinese people. Listen to this story and then discuss how history can be controlled.

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May 30, 2014

7:53

Few women in engineering

Few Women in Engineering Due to Gender Gap

Olin College in Massachusetts has one of the largest student populations of female engineers, which is rare because so few women go into the sciences. There is a documented gender and confidence gap for female engineers, but students think it can be closed by reaching girls at an earlier age. Listen to this radio story to find out how schools are fixing this problem.

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May 29, 2014

5:42

Maya angelou  poet  author  and civil rights activist  dies at 86

Maya Angelou, Poet, Author and Civil Rights Activist, Dies at 86

Maya Angelou, celebrated poet, writer of I know Why the Caged Bird Sings, and Civil Rights Activist, passed away at the age of 86. She was a celebrity and an iconic figure in the African-American community. Listen to this radio story with your students to learn the extent of her impact.

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May 27, 2014

9:28

To relieve

To Relieve Burdens of War, African Man Turns to Music Played on Glasses

A man has attracted a lot of YouTube attention by playing songs like “Happy” and the theme from “Game of Thrones” on half-filled wine glasses. This man is also from the Democratic Republic of Congo where he fled his country because of war to study in America. Listen to this radio story with your students to learn how music is helping him heal.

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May 26, 2014

4:03

%22honor flights%22 honor wwii veterans before time runs out

“Honor Flights” Celebrate WWII Veterans Before Time Runs Out

An “Honor Flight” is a trip that takes Veterans from all over the country to visit memorial sites set up to honor their service in WWII. Vets take this opportunity to share war stories. However, these “Flights” need to happen faster as time is not on the Veterans’ sides. Listen to this radio story with your students to discuss the impact of Veterans.

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May 23, 2014

3:57

School newspaper bans

School Newspaper Bans the Word “Redskins,” School Board to Vote

A school newspaper in Philadelphia is refusing to print the word “Redskin,” the name of their school mascot, in the newspaper because of its racist roots. Some parents and students feel that’s taking political correctness too far. They say it’s not the role of student journalists to alter the name of a team’s mascot. Now the school board will weigh in and decide whether or not to force the paper to print the name of the team’s mascot.

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May 22, 2014

4:13

Recycled toilet water is the solution for one drought stricken town

Recycled Toilet Water is the Solution for One Drought-Stricken Town

A Texas town has been living in severe drought conditions for three years and decided to recycle water from toilets, sinks, and other wash to meet their water needs. Water plant officials say that the water is completely clean of bacteria, but residents would rather drink bottled water. Listen to this public radio story and discuss with your students.

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May 21, 2014

4:00

Teenagers picking tobacco are at risk of nicotine poisoning

Teenagers Picking Tobacco Are At Risk of Nicotine Poisoning

Young workers who aren’t old enough to buy a pack of cigarettes are allowed to harvest tobacco in the United States. Human Rights Watch says while it’s legal to have kids as young as 12 pick tobacco, it’s not legal to put children’s health at risk of nicotine poisoning. Human Rights Watch is calling on the major tobacco companies to stop putting kids to work in tobacco fields. Listen to this public radio story with your students and discuss.

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May 20, 2014

5:19

Should we keep or kill the last vile of smallpox

Should We Keep or Kill the Last Vials of Smallpox?

The disease smallpox was successfully eliminated in 1977, but two research facilities still hold the last samples of the smallpox virus. The World Health Organization is going to vote soon on the future of the smallpox samples. Should we keep the virus to study it or completely destroy it because it could get into the wrong hands? Listen to this story and discuss.

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May 19, 2014

6:47

Polar ice melting is unstoppable  how should we prepare

Polar Ice Melting Is Unstoppable, How Should We Prepare?

Polar ice in Antarctica is melting and that creates rises in sea level that will greatly impact coastal cities like Boston. Scientists believe that it’s now time to think of solutions that address the unavoidable problems created by global climate change.

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May 16, 2014

2:59

Climate change makes food grow fewer nutrients

Climate Change Makes Food Grow Fewer Nutrients

Climate change will not only create extreme weather, but scientists have found that areas with more carbon dioxide grow less healthy crops. Although these crops are much larger in size, they lack nutrients such as zinc and iron. Listen to these findings on the long-term impact of CO2 on crops.

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May 15, 2014

4:34

Journalists increasingly using drones to get a sneak peak at a story

Journalists Increasingly Using Drones to Get a Sneak Peek at a Story

Drones are not just for military use anymore. They are being used by journalists to report stories. But this is raising some privacy concerns.

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May 14, 2014

4:40

Ukraine ed

The Government Cleans House in Post-Revolution Ukraine

Post-Revolution Ukraine is starting a “lustration,” or a process of cleaning house to separate from the old regime. Some believe that this is a type of witch hunt, but others think that the heavy hand is needed for Ukraine’s new, clean start.

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May 13, 2014

7:48

Remembering the alamo

Remembering the Alamo

Anglo Americans were once considered “illegal aliens” in Texas, then a Mexican state. This story is a modern day road trip to the Alamo that looks back to 1836 when American settlers fought with Mexico to eventually gain control of Mexico and the Southwestern territories. It explains how the dividing line between America and Mexico was drawn.

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May 12, 2014

3:57

Climate change to stay

Climate Change to Stay

A recent report by the U.S. government shows the most definitive evidence so far that climate change is happening and it’s being driven by people. Extreme weather and rising sea levels are just some of the consequences. Communities are trying to build preventative infrastructure, but it is costly.

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May 9, 2014

4:29

Affirmative action ban

Affirmative Action Ban

Affirmative action ensured that college applicants of color would have greater representation at universities. With the Supreme Court’s recent ruling, states now have the choice to uphold or ignore affirmative action.

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May 8, 2014

7:46

Space thief

Space Thief

An American scientist was able to beat other countries to reach a comet first by “stealing” another scientist’s space craft. 31 years later, he’s on a mission to restore it to its original mission.

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May 7, 2014

4:14

Asian american health disparities

Asian American Health Disparities

In Asian American communities, there are many different geographical and cultural disparities that impact behaviors and therefore the risk of certain diseases like diabetes or cancer. To better treat these groups, doctors should be aware of what part of Asia patients are from.

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May 6, 2014

3:48

Botched oklahoma execution

Botched Oklahoma Execution

An Oklahoma execution went wrong when the prisoner was in apparent agony instead of a quick death through lethal injection. The governor is now calling for a review of execution procedures, which has ignited a death penalty debate.

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May 5, 2014

3:46

Racism in the nba

Racism in the NBA

Los Angeles Clippers owner, Donald Sterling, is now banned from the NBA and its games due to his discriminatory remarks that were caught on tape. He’s also being pressured to sell the Clippers. The public is also seeing this event as part of the civil rights movement. Listen to this story to learn why.

Note: Donald Sterling sold the Clippers four months after this story aired.

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May 3, 2014

4:49

Starwars.square

‘Star Wars’ Movies and Beyond

George Lucas’s Star Wars films are an empire unto themselves. With two movie trilogies and another on the way, the films are prolific, as are the universe they build. This is matched and raised by hundreds of Star Wars books that mirror and expand the narrative of the movies. Some hardcore fans even prefer the books, which cover 25,000 years and include 17,000 characters. Listen to learn more about the unprecedented success of this movie based book franchise.

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