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November 28, 2013

8:15

Jfk.speech

Kennedy’s Inspiring Message

President John Fitzgerald Kennedy was the youngest man elected to the presidency and the first and only Roman Catholic to serve as president. His election represented a departure from the status quo. The message Kennedy delivered in his inauguration speech on January 20, 1961 served as inspiration for a generation. Listen to hear excerpts of his speech and learn how it inspired four young people to action.

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November 27, 2013

4:44

Fibonaccialo

What are Fibonacci’s Numbers?

In life and in math class we use the numerals 0 through 9 every day. They are the basis of our financial system and shape the way we understand value. We have a young Italian mathematician named Leonardo da Pisa, nicknamed Fibonacci, to thank for this. In 1202 he published a book called “Book of Calculation” that introduced these numerals to Europe, replacing Roman numerals and the abacus once and for all. Listen to learn more about the man and concept behind Fibonacci and his numbers.

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November 26, 2013

3:39

Key.peele

Slang Through The Ages

From accents to slang to dialect, people who speak English do not always sound the same. The way people speak reflects a lot of different factors in their lives including region, race, class and education. Some slang is reflective of an era. The word “groovy” will forever be linked to hippies, while other pronunciations reflect a longer history of language, colonization and power. Listen to learn how the pronunciation of the word “ask” has changed over time, and how the black community uses code-switching to adapt to their surroundings.

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November 25, 2013

7:47

Jfk.assassination

Remembering Kennedy’s Assassination

Decades of Americans are able to remember where they were at the moment they heard President John F. Kennedy had been shot and killed in Dallas, Texas on November 22, 1963. Fifty years later in this radio story we relive the events of that fateful day through the memories of two reporters who were there. Hugh Aynesworth was a local reporter for The Dallas Morning News and Sid Davis was a White House correspondent traveling with the president's press corps. Put yourselves in their shoes as they take you through how they learned about and covered the assassination.

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November 25, 2013

3:36

Raymond carver

The Simple Elegance of Raymond Carver

Minimalist author Raymond Carver is known for his simple but powerful short stories of ordinary people. This gritty minimalism both reflects and contradicts the tough and chaotic life of the man himself. Listen to learn more about the life and contradictions of this American author heavily influenced by the work of Anton Chekhov.

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November 24, 2013

4:46

Jfk.secretservice

The Secret Service and JFK’s Assassination

The United States Secret Service has grown and evolved since its creation in 1865. Originally tasked with suppressing and investigating counterfeit money, the Secret Service took on the responsibility of protecting the president after the assassination of President William McKinley in 1901. The assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963, had an equally dramatic effect on the way the Secret Service provided protection. Listen to learn more about the lapses in security that lead to the assassination and the changes implemented since.

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November 23, 2013

9:21

Jfk.dallas

Why Dallas? The Setting for Assassination in 1963

The assassination of President John F. Kennedy on November 22, 1963 shocked the nation, but the setting of his assassination was less surprising. Dallas, Texas was the center of the anti-Kennedy movement in the United States. Powerful business men, elected officials and Baptist preachers had all joined together to call for the overthrow of President Kennedy for treason. They had whipped up an atmosphere of hate and hysteria in the large southern city. It was into this atmosphere that President Kennedy rode in an open motorcade and was shot by Lee Harvey Oswald from an abandoned building along the route. Listen to learn more about the setting of the assassination.

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November 22, 2013

3:24

St. cuthbert

Million Dollar Medieval Gospel

St. Cuthbert, an Anglo-Saxon monk, hermit and saint, was known for his ability to heal and revered in Medieval England. During his lifetime he recorded the St. John’s gospel in Latin. This book went with him to the grave and was rediscovered when his body was moved to a new shrine in 1104. The British Library purchased the book, known as the St. Cuthbert Gospel, for $14 million. Listen to learn more about the fascinating history of this medieval book.

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November 22, 2013

4:54

How kennedy handled the cuban missile crisis

How Kennedy Handled the Cuban Missile Crisis

50 years ago today, President John F. Kennedy was assassinated. Looking back on the key moments in his presidency, the Cuban Missile Crisis stands out. In 1962, the U.S came dangerously close to igniting a global nuclear war with the Soviet Union. President John F. Kennedy showed that in a time of crisis, one must ultimately worry about not just protecting his own American citizens but about all people. Listen to this story to hear how JFK urged diplomacy despite the pressure for war.

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November 21, 2013

4:50

Richard iii

King Richard III’s Remains Found Under a Parking Lot

Richard III, the last York King, was the King of England from 1483 to 1485. After his death in 1485 at the Battle of Bosworth, the Tudor dynasty began. The Tudors, with the help of William Shakespeare, worked to depict Richard has a hunchbacked villain. But the real story is more complex. In 2012 Richard’s remains were found under a parking lot, the site of a cathedral in the 15th century. They were exhumed and reburied at Leicester Cathedral in 2015. Listen to learn more about this fascinating discovery and the Medieval smear campaign that led to Shakespeare’s depiction of Richard III.

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November 21, 2013

4:28

Low cost private schools in kenya

Low-cost Private Schools in Kenya

Several non-profits are targeting families in Africa making less than $2 per day: they want to give those families' children a chance to gain a world class education with affordable tuition. However, stakeholders in Africa feel like chains of low-cost private schools are actually accomplishing the opposite and do not allow access to education for the poorest kids. Discuss with your students the importance of education and what kind of aid is actually helpful by listening to this story.

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November 20, 2013

4:47

Davvycrockett

The Legend of Davy Crockett

Davy Crockett lives in the American imagination as a legendary frontiersman and defender of the Alamo. Crockett lived an extraordinary life in the 1830s, but became even more famous in the 1950s when Walt Disney chose Davy Crockett as a character for his new theme park, Disneyland. From the coonskin cap to his death at the Alamo, this story analyzes the reality behind the myth of Davy Crockett’s life.

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November 20, 2013

9:56

Jfk storngly supported the civil rights movement

JFK Strongly Supported the Civil Rights Movement

President John F. Kennedy remains one of most popular presidents among African-Americans. He helped Dr. Martin Luther King get out of jail and stood for civil rights policies. Tragically, he was not able to personally complete the bill for equal rights, though his successor did. Listen to this story about how JFK struggled to stand up for civil rights despite an important party of opposing opinions and escalating violent acts.

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November 20, 2013

3:47

Deadly typhoon ravages phillipines

Deadly Typhoon Ravages Philippines

Over the weekend, thousands of people in the Philippines died as Typhoon Haiyan ravaged the area. It was one of the strongest typhoons ever recorded. Listen to this story to understand why this storm caused so much damage.

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November 19, 2013

4:52

Shakespearesonnets

Shakespeare’s Private Sonnets

William Shakespeare wrote some of the most famous and recognizable love poems of all time, but some historians think that Shakespeare had no intention of publishing these private messages. His sonnets were largely biographical and it is believed they were written to another man. When a collection of these personal sonnets were published by a shady publisher named Thomas Thorpe, Shakespeare tried to stop their distribution. Listen to learn more about Shakespeare’s sonnets and their unwanted publication.

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November 18, 2013

4:54

Shakespeare.theglobe

How to Pronounce Shakespeare’s Verse

We often think of Shakespeare’s verse as grand, beautiful and proper. The British Library has analyzed the rhyme of Shakespeare’s work and discovered the original pronunciation and dialect of his writings when they were first performed at the Globe Theater. Listen to hear how Shakespeare may have sounded 400 years ago.

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November 15, 2013

7:50

Kingjamesbible

King James Bible Relevant Today

The King James Bible has a rich history. King James I, a Scot who became King of England, had the Christian Bible translated for the Church of England in order to legitimize his rule in the early 1600s. The legacy of the King James Bible lives on in the English language. From books to songs and idioms, the King James Bible has become part of English culture and language. Listen to learn more about the King James Bible from 1603 to today.

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November 15, 2013

2:11

Students' response to video game data tracking

Students' Response to Video Game Data Tracking

After Edward Snowden exposed the U.S government's spying activities, it is impossible to know what gets monitored and what doesn't. However, video game companies aren't hiding as we learned in this story posted last week. Video game companies are tracking players' every action to increase the addiction - so why aren't people as outraged at video game companies as they are at the government? Learn more about what third grade students think after hearing about the science behind video game addiction by listening to this story.

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November 14, 2013

8:11

Dantesinferno

Dante’s Inferno Comes Alive in Latest English Translation

Dante Alighieri finished writing the three part epic poem “Divine Comedy” in 1321. The poem’s three parts, hell, purgatory and heaven follow one man on his journey through all three imaginary places. This great work of Italian literature has survived the ages and remains a classic today. There have been many translations of Dante’s work. This story interviews Clive James, the most recent English translator, about this epic poem and his translated version of “Divine Comedy.”

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November 13, 2013

8:21

Gulliverstravel

Modern Take on ‘Gulliver’s Travels’

Jonathan Swift’s 1726 classic “Gulliver’s Travels” is a satirical tale of travels to a long-lost land. A modern-day movie, starring actor Jack Black, takes the centuries old classic and begins the story in modern day New York City. Listen to learn more about the original novel and this new movie adaptation.

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November 13, 2013

5:59

Keeping native american languages alive

Keeping Native American Languages Alive

As part of Native American History month, listen to this story with students to hear one man's story about keeping alive his Native American language.

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November 12, 2013

4:54

Janeaustenhouse

Exploring Jane Austen Through Everyday Objects

Author Jane Austen is well known for her novels that reflect on romance and the familial and cultural standards of late 18th century England. Some paint Austen as a drab spinster, but a new biography by Paula Byrne explores the real Austen through objects that were important to her in her life and literature. This portrait of an opinionated, fun loving Austen will help you understand her life, family and themes she revisits in her works.

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November 11, 2013

7:20

Macbeth

A One-Man Macbeth on Stage

William Shakespeare’s play “Macbeth” is a tragedy that wrestles with issues of power, ambition and madness. From witches and ghosts to murder, this classic tale has been staged for decades. A new rendition is set in a psychiatric institution and is played almost entirely by one actor, Alan Cumming. Listen to learn more about the original story and this unique adaptation.

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November 8, 2013

5:35

Frankenstein

Drawing Frankenstein

Mary Shelley’s gothic classic “Frankenstein” was published anonymously when she was just twenty. The novel was a horror story, but it was also part of the romantic movement and is considered by some to be one of the first science fiction novels. Shelley’s work has been retold through illustration and movies in the past, but not all have been true to the original story. A new graphic novel by artist Gris Grimly brings this tale to life with care and accuracy. Listen to learn what drew Gris Grimly to the story and what drove him to create this graphic novel.

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November 7, 2013

8:22

Johnkeats

Tribute to Romantic Love and Keats

English Romantic poetry is often misunderstood and not considered in the context of the life of the poets or the era in which they lived. The movie “Bright Star” by director Jane Campion explores the life of poet John Keats and the romantic relationship that drove him to write his most famous works. Campion explores the short life and love of this well-known poet. From the difficulty people have understanding poetry to considering Keats, Byron and Shelley in their historical context, this interview with Campion will open your eyes to the world of 19th Century English Romantic poetry.

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November 6, 2013

3:57

Brontesisters

The Imaginative Childhood of The Brontë Sisters

The Brontë sisters, Charlotte, Emily and Jane, were successful novelists and poets. Their childhood, relationships and imagination shaped their famous works. A tiny “magazine” created by 14-year-old Charlotte Brontë to go with their set of toy soldiers is a lens into their world of imagination and gothic extravagance. Listen to learn more about this work, just half the size of a credit card, and what it tells us about the life of these famous literary figures.

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November 5, 2013

3:00

Rudyard kipling

Rudyard Kipling’s Poetry

Author Rudyard Kipling was the most popular writer of his era. He wrote novels, short stories and poems that adults and children have enjoyed for generations. Kipling lives on through his children stories like “The Jungle Book” and his most controversial poem “The White Man’s Burden." Born in India and relocated to England, Kipling experienced colonial life firsthand. Kipling’s support of colonial expansion has caused some to brand him as an imperialist. Listen to learn more about his life and hear some of his newly discovered poetry.

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November 4, 2013

9:13

Lord tennyson

Lord Tennyson and the Real Light Brigade

Alfred Tennyson, better known as Lord Tennyson, was Poet Laureate of Great Britain and Ireland for 42 years during the reign of Queen Victoria. His short lyrical poems appealed to the people of the 19th century, many of whom couldn’t read. One of this most famous poems “The Charge of the Light Brigade” describes a real event during the Crimean War. This charge, during the Battle of Balaclava in 1854, became the most well known action of the war thanks to Tennyson’s poem, even though the poem wasn’t entirely accurate. Listen to learn more about the Crimean, War, the real charge and how Tennyson’s words brought this event to life for the British people.

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November 1, 2013

7:42

The science behind video game addiction

The Science Behind Video Game Addiction

From the early days of Pong to the current obsession with Minecraft, the pull to video games has never wavered; if anything, it has strengthened through the targeted efforts of the video game industry. As players sit at home, researchers are gathering data about your habits and interests from each action you make in the game, so they are literally "getting into" the minds of players as well as their wallets. Listen to this story to see how they do it.

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November 1, 2013

5:45

Winston churchill

The Power of Winston Churchill’s Speeches

Winston Churchill, prime minister of Great Britain during World War II, was a master orator. His speeches were painstakingly written, meticulously planned and seamlessly delivered. Churchill was given a Nobel Prize in LIterature for his powerful speeches and his other written works. Listen to learn more about the speeches that Churchill wrote and delivered, and the effect they had on shaping World War II.

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October 31, 2013

3:18

The income gap  illustrated with candy corn

The Income Gap, Illustrated with Candy Corn

In the last 30 years the rich have become richer. Lower-income earners gained 18%, the middle class earned 40%, and the top 1% of wage earners gained 275%. What's a good way to illustrate to students how the gap as widened? Candy Corn! Listen to this story to hear an audio graph of the income gap. Then discuss with students what it means for an economy and society with a large income gap and possible alternatives to redistribute wealth more evenly.

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October 31, 2013

3:45

Wwipoets

War Poets of World War I

When World War I ended on November 11, 1918, the world was relieved. The death and destruction of “The Great War” was over. In modern history the First World War is often overshadowed by the Second, but its legacy of war poets cannot be overlooked. From soldiers in battle to people on the home front, poetry was used to process and communicate the realities of war and loss. Listen to learn more about these poets and hear some of their works.

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October 30, 2013

10:43

Samuel beckett

Samuel Beckett’s Complex Life

Playwright Samuel Beckett is known for his postmodernist, absurdist and dark comedy writing. His work, including his most famous play 'Waiting for Godot,' is hard to grasp initially but reflected the post World War II era and his own worldview. Beckett had a complex life as a man and a writer. Listen to learn more about Samuel Beckett’s life and his plays.

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October 29, 2013

6:21

T s eliot

T.S. Eliot and Modernism

Thomas Stearns Eliot OM, better known as T.S. Eliot, was one of the great modernist poets of the 20th century. His work was part of a specific moment in history and art, before and after World War I, when identity, nations and art were fractured. Imagine the modernism of Picasso and Cubism and apply the same idea to poetry. Listen to learn more about the world in which Eliot wrote and why his poem “The Waste Land” remains one of the pillars of high modernism.

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October 25, 2013

4:25

Pajero in saudi arabia

Saudi Women Taking the Wheel to Protest Driving Ban

In Riyadh, Saudi Arabia, activists are challenging the ban on women driving by taking the wheel and documenting their protests by video. Madiha Al Ajroush, a longtime advocate of women driving, compares the inability to drive like cutting one's legs off and taking the wheelchair away. This is not the first attempt to challenge the ban. There were two previous attempts in 1990 and 2011. Use this story to talk to your students about the struggle for women's rights on a global scale and how that compares to rights women currently have in the United States.

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October 22, 2013

16:14

22419395331 d115378a75 k

Malala Yousafzai Continues Fight for Girls' Education

Sixteen-year-old Malala Yousafzai was shot in the head by the Taliban in the Swat Valley of Pakistan because she campaigned for education for girls. After recovering from her injury in England, she has now released a book, met with President Obama, and been considered for the Nobel Peace Prize. Malala's father compares her fight for equal education to Dr. Martin Luther King Jr.'s own battle for equal rights. Listen to her interview to start a discussion about advocacy, rights, and education.

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September 19, 2013

3:02

No guns with coffee

No Guns With Coffee

Starbucks Coffee has a new policy. While the coffee shop used to allow guns, it’s now saying that they’re no longer welcome. Starbucks is not explicitly banning these weapons, but instead just asking customers to leave them at home. This new policy has been met with mixed reactions. Click here to listen to this story about how the gun debate is mixing with coffee.

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September 11, 2013

7:22

Heroism.harry.houdini

What Makes a Hero?

What is heroism? Explore this question through a discussion with author Conn Iggulden, who wrote a book about heroes throughout time. From Florence Nightingale to Harry Houdini to the passengers of United Airlines Flight 93, heroes of all different kinds have shown admirable bravery. This story discusses the courage and grace that makes heroes of ordinary people.

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March 11, 2013

4:52

Love.acrossgenerations

Love and Care Across Generations

In many families and cultures it is common to have multiple generations living under one roof. This type of multigenerational living arrangement is experiencing a resurgence in the United States as the baby boomer generation ages. As families make decisions about how to care for their elders, some households expand and become multigenerational. The Martin family of Harrisburg, Pennsylvania is one of these families. When David Martin’s grandmother AnnaBelle Bowers, also known as “Snootzie,” needed care, he and his wife LaDonna decided to have her come live with them. David, LaDonna and their two children have worked together to make this experience a good one. Listen to learn how they balance their responsibilities across the generations.

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February 1, 2013

3:03

Robertfrost

A Friend Remembers Robert Frost

American poet Robert Frost wrote about rural life in New England. His colloquial language and focus on nature struck a chord with everyday people and critics. He won four Pulitzer Prizes for poetry during his lifetime, and his legacy has lived on through his writing and his friends. Listen to learn more about Frost’s life, work and religion through his friend, Jonathan Reichert.

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