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October 16, 2014

3:35

Caveart.hands.square

Indonesian Cave Paintings

Cave painting has long been thought to be developed by early humans in Europe. A new discovery of equally old cave paintings on an island in Indonesia has upset this perspective and is pushing scientists to look even farther back to our human origins in Africa. Listen to this public radio story to hear more about the cave paintings themselves and to learn how archeologists discovered their true age.

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October 15, 2014

4:05

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India Goes to Mars Cheaply

India successfully sent a spacecraft and probe to orbit Mars in September. The United States also has a probe orbiting Mars- but their mission costs ten times as much as the India mission. Why is that? From spacecraft, to orbit shape, to payroll - this public radio story explores why these price tags were so different.

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October 14, 2014

3:40

Whitehouse.square

Protecting the White House

The Secret Service has been under scrutiny this month for high profile failures to protect President Obama and the First Family. First there was the successful attempt of fence jumper Omar Gonzalez to enter the White House with a knife. Then an armed man was found on an elevator with the president. Now there are calls for the Secret Service to tighten up its efforts to keep the President safe. Listen to this public radio story to learn more about these lapses and what can be done to strengthen the Secret Service.

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October 13, 2014

4:11

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Recycling Food Waste

The Seattle City Council is launching a mandatory composting program to stop people from throwing food waste in the trash. Mandatory recycling has expanded from yard waste, to normal recyclables, and now to compostable food waste. With the addition of a third trash bin, the city hopes to collect 100,000 tons of food waste a year. Listen to this public radio story to hear about the motivations, logistics, and goals of the program.

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October 10, 2014

8:35

Columbus

America Before Columbus

Columbus Day is celebrated every October, but our understanding of Christopher Columbus and his “discovery” of America has changed dramatically since Columbus Day became a federal holiday in 1937. This change of perception has come with more knowledge of what the Americas and Native American cultures were truly like before Europeans arrived. Highly complex and organized communities could be found in places like the Aztec capital of Tenochtitlan. This public radio story paints a vivid picture of the Americas before Columbus and compares our original understandings of the area with reality.

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October 9, 2014

4:50

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Curtailing Weapons Exports in Germany

Germany is one of the top three exporters of weapons but the new economy minister is working to curb exports by enforcing arms rules and stopping sales to countries not in the European Union or NATO. His actions have politicians, arms exporters and workers upset that he is risking German jobs, security and reputation. Critics argue that other countries will take over production from Germany. This public radio story looks at both sides of the issue and can spark debate about who is responsible for weapons falling into the hands of dangerous groups.

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October 8, 2014

4:42

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Preparing for a Future of Flooding: Tearing Down Homes

In recent years natural disasters have highlighted the dangers of living along the coast in a time of rising sea levels and unpredictable weather. People with homes on the coast face a difficult decision as their homes lose value. Should they try and sell their homes and move, or stay and hope for the best? State governments and environmental groups are increasingly supporting people moving away, so that land can be reclaimed as a storm buffer. Listen to this public radio story to hear from homeowners who are in this difficult position.

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October 7, 2014

5:46

Njmeadowlands.square

Preparing for a Future of Flooding: Build Parks

Nearly two years ago Hurricane Sandy devastated communities on the New Jersey coast, leaving governments, scientists, architects, and citizens looking for innovative solutions to protect against natural disasters. This public radio story looks at the design and thinking behind the New Meadowlands Project in New Jersey. From the appeal of a new Central Park, to the protection wetlands provide neighboring communities from flooding, this story will get your students thinking about the benefits and challenges of implementing big environmental protection projects.

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October 5, 2014

3:47

Hongkong.square

Protests in Hong Kong

Protests in Hong Kong, which is controlled by China, escalated in the past week. Hong Kong transitioned from British to Chinese rule in 1997. Now thousands of demonstrators are expressing their displeasure with the way China is running Hong Kong. They want the Chinese picked Chief Executive to resign and a more democratic process to choose a new one. Listen to this public radio story to hear a first hand account of the protests and what’s at stake.

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October 3, 2014

7:41

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Growing Heirloom Apples a Life Long Devotion

It is apple picking season and apple lovers are gearing up to eat some tasty and unique apples. The apples we are used to seeing in the supermarket are the same basic size and shape. And they have the familiar flavor profiles. But there are more apple varieties than you might imagine. There's a whole world of biodiversity in apples. This public radio story takes you to a heirloom apple orchard in Vermont that specializes in grafting and maintaining historic varieties of apples. Get ready to visualize (and almost taste!) some unique looking apples.

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October 2, 2014

3:50

Isis.square

Understanding ISIS

The United States and its allies are currently bombing terrorist strongholds in Iraq and Syria after the group ISIS, the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, stepped up its violence against non-Sunni muslim Iraqis and Western hostages. ISIS now controls territory in both Syria and Iraq. The terrorist group is moving towards the goal of creating a unified Islamic State. This public radio story helps explain who this group is, what their goals are and how they are different from al-Qaida.

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October 1, 2014

4:42

Peterson.square

How Widespread is Spanking?

The line between appropriate discipline and child abuse has been debated in the news lately in response to the child abuse allegations against Minnesota Vikings star running back Adrian Peterson. In this public radio story we hear about the history of corporal punishment in the United States, the frequency of punishment in the home and in school, as well as how different parts of the country punish children differently.

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September 30, 2014

3:41

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Cricket Food - A New Food Frontier

Crickets are seen as a little but loud insect, some might think they are creepy, others cute, but most Americans don’t see crickets as food. This might start changing as the world searches for more environmentally sound sources of protein. Whether people fry crickets or use ground cricket flour to enrich their baked good - crickets are coming. This public radio story takes you to a farm that grows crickets in Ohio and provides a rich framework to understand the advantages to eating insects.

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September 29, 2014

3:44

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A Look At Mars' Atmosphere

Last week NASA’s MAVEN probe began orbiting Mars in an effort to measure and map the Martian atmosphere. Today, Mars, known as the red planet, is bone dry and it’s atmosphere is being broken down by the sun’s solar winds, but evidence shows that it was once much more like Earth. From liquid channels to lake beds, there is clear evidence that Mars once had water as well as a magnetic field. So what happened to this water? These are the answers the MAVEN is searching for by mapping Mars’ current atmosphere. Listen to learn more about this important mission.

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September 26, 2014

6:43

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Arctic Explorer from Franklin Expedition Found

In 1845 two ships led by Sir John Franklin left England searching for a northern route across the globe, known as the Northwest Passage. They never returned. 169 years later, a helicopter pilot found a clue that led the Canadian government to one of the missing ships. From sonar imaging to video cameras on submarines, archeologists have confirmed that this is one of the abandoned ships from the famous expedition. Listen to hear about the haunting story this discovery has unearthed.

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September 25, 2014

7:50

Scientists.square

The Future of Scientific Discoveries in Jeopardy

In the last decade, increases in government funding to scientific research through the National Institute of Health (NIH) has spurred massive growth at universities across the country. Now, with congressional reductions in discretionary spending, inflation and increasing cost of research, scientists across the country have lost the NIH funding that was at the core of the research. Listen to this public radio story to hear how scientists at three different research institutes are dealing with this funding squeeze.

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September 24, 2014

6:51

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A 13-year-old Child Migrant Tells His Story

This summer an unprecedented number of unaccompanied young people crossed the border illegally into the United States. Many came with hopes of reuniting with family in the U.S. and escaping violence in their home countries. Now, their futures are uncertain as they are put in detention centers while their cases are processed. In today’s public radio story you meet a 13-year-old migrant and his 11-year-old brother and hear from them about their journey across the border.

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September 23, 2014

5:12

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Birds Signal Climate Change

A recent report shows carbon dioxide levels in the atmosphere rose at a record rate in 2013. Humans aren’t the only species affected by these changes. A new report by the National Audubon Society makes it clear that bird species in the U.S. and Canada are at risk of losing their habitats and potentially their lives due to climate change. Listen to this public radio story with your class to learn more about the links between changing temperatures and bird habitat and survival.

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September 22, 2014

4:04

Scotland.600.600

Scotland Votes No to Independence

On Thursday Scottish citizens, 16 and above, turned out in record numbers to vote on the referendum on Scottish independence from the United Kingdom. Scotland and England joined to become the United Kingdom of Britain in 1707. Three-hundred and seven years later, 55% of Scottish voters voted No to independence and chose to remain in the United Kingdom. But this does not mean the status quo will remain the same. British Prime Minister David Cameron has promised Scots increased autonomy and decision making power over Scottish domestic policy. Listen to this public radio story with your class and discuss what the vote means for the future of unified United Kingdom.

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September 19, 2014

8:35

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School Busing 40 Years Later

Twenty years after Brown vs. The Board of Education ruled that racial segregation in schools was unconstitutional, Boston began to desegregate its school system through busing. The city’s plan to bus 18,000 students to schools outside of their neighborhoods met intense and violent resistance from the first day. The hostility and hatred radiated through Boston for months. Today’s public radio story features audio from that tumultuous period and testimonials from Boston residents who lived through the turbulent efforts to integrate public schools. NOTE: Story includes strong language from the protests.

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September 18, 2014

5:17

Bayou.square

Coastal Erosion Ends a Way of Life

In the last century, the coastline of Louisiana’s Lower Mississippi Delta has experienced an enormous loss of land. From man made levees, to hurricanes, to oil spills, the coastline and it’s communities have been negatively affected. In today’s public radio story as we hear from a fishing guide who has lived and worked in the area for 34 years. Listen to learn more about the societal impact of coastal erosion.

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September 17, 2014

5:03

Townhall.square

A Young Boy's Passion for Politics

Today is Constitution Day. Help your students learn good citizenship with this story about an 11-year-old boy who loves politics. While reporting on the unrest in Ferguson, Missouri a reporter met Marquis Govan. This public radio story takes us to Marquis’ home and school in Missouri and tells the story of how he got involved in politics, how he stays engaged and what he hopes for in the future. Sharpen your listening skills and learn ways that young people can be engaged in politics well before they are old enough to vote.

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September 16, 2014

2:49

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Close Up Look at an Active Volcano

A month ago, earthquakes below a volcano in Iceland alerted scientists that an eruption was beginning. Various eruptions have created ash, fire and lava at the Bardarbunga volcano. This spouting lava creates rolling fields of lava that scientists have had an opportunity to study up close. When you listen to this public radio story you will hear the sounds of the volcano recorded by a scientist who recently visited the Bardarbunga volcano.

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September 15, 2014

3:45

Nato.square

The Changing Role of NATO

Russian military intervention in Ukraine, one of Russia's former republics, has the international community on guard. At a summit last week, NATO, the North Atlantic Treaty Organization, reinforced its commitment to protect member states from Russian aggression and prepared for this possibility. Improve your listening skills with this public radio story that gives an overview of the NATO summit and its response to international threats.

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September 12, 2014

4:22

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Supply and Demand at the Meat Counter

This summer pork and beef prices are 11% higher than they were last summer. This rise in cost has not changed the buying habits of consumers. Today’s public radio story looks at the economics behind this rise in cost, and how supply and demand play into cost. It also features the perspective of farmers and people in the pork industry. Listen to learn why the supply of pork and beef is much lower this year than in years past.

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September 11, 2014

4:17

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Organizing Labor Movements Without Unions

The success of workers at the Massachusetts supermarket chain, Market Basket, is making labor movements across the country rethink their strategies. In this labor dispute, workers walked off the job to protest the CEO of the company being fired. They didn’t come back to work until he was reinstated by the board of directors. All this was accomplished without a union. This public radio story looks at the ways the Market Basket strike is unique and how it can and can’t be duplicated by other labor movements or unions. Listen to learn more about the power of using technology to organize and the importance of management joining collective action.

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September 10, 2014

4:16

Chicks.square

Raising Antibiotic Free Chickens

Last week Perdue became the first major poultry company to eliminate the use of antibiotics in its chicken hatcheries. This step has public health advocates and consumers cheering because the use of antibiotics in meat production increases the risk that bacteria will evolve to be resistant to antibiotics, which could make it more difficult to treat humans. This public radio story takes you directly to a hatchery and explores the reasons Perdue made this decision. Listen to learn more about the use and elimination of antibiotics in meat production

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September 9, 2014

4:13

Ac.night.square

The Economics of Casino Gambling

Atlantic City, New Jersey was once the only place to gamble on the East Coast. This monopoly is over, as other states have opened or planned to build casinos. Atlantic City and its residents are feeling the negative impacts of a more competitive gambling market. In today’s public radio story casino workers and public officials reflect on these changes and look forward to what is next for Atlantic City.

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September 8, 2014

4:20

Line.square

Candidates Try To Appeal To Male Voters With Sports

The gender gap in voting preferences in the 2012 election was the largest in history. Men voted overwhelmingly for Republican candidates, women voted Democratic. Men also vote less frequently than women. This has pushed politicians to focus on how they can effectively reach men, particularly young men. Today’s public radio story looks at ad placement and self-presentation as candidates try to reach more men.

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September 5, 2014

3:42

Rocks.square

The Mystery of the Moving Rocks

Large rocks on the desert floor in California’s Death Valley have puzzled miners and scientists for years. These heavy rocks have long winding trails in the sand behind them but no one had ever seen the rocks move. For the last 60 years scientists have searched for answers but now with the use of GPS and video cameras they have solved the mystery. Listen to this public radio story to engage your student in the mystery and the science behind the moving rocks.

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September 4, 2014

4:00

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Earthquake Warning System on an App

Earthquakes cause damage and create fear and uncertainty. But a new early warning system called Shake Alert is working to mitigate both. This phone app can rapidly detect earthquakes once they have begun, giving people time to prepare. The app is in the early testing stage but it successfully gave a warning before the recent earthquake in California. Listen to this public radio story to learn more about the technology and goals behind this early warning system.

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September 3, 2014

4:54

Schoolsupplies.square

Back to School Shopping

This back-to-school season parents and economists alike are shocked by the costs associated with preparing students for school. Schools are increasingly asking families to buy supplies for the classroom and school, as well as personalized technology. The additional costs have some questioning whether it is reasonable. Listen to this public radio story to learn more about how families and schools are adjusting to increased technological costs.

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September 2, 2014

8:26

Wheelchair.beach.square

Helping Paralyzed People Walk

More than a quarter of a million people in the United States have spinal cord injuries, and two million are in wheelchairs. A new technology from ReWalk Robotics brings some paraplegics the possibility of walking, with the help of a motorized exoskeleton. This radio story gives an inside look at the technology and the impact it can have on the lives of its users. Listen to learn more about the successes of the product as well as current obstacles and future goals.

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September 1, 2014

2:10

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The Economics of an Early School Day

High School students often begin class between 7 and 8 a.m. despite medical recommendations that schools start later to give student more time to sleep. The negative effects of sleep deprivation, including lower academic performance, has pushed some experts to argue that this is one of the least expensive ways to increase student performance. However, efforts to push back start times have a big roadblock: bus schedules. Listen to today’s public radio story to learn more about why the economics of an earlier school day might not work.

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August 29, 2014

4:53

Classroom.square

Designing the School of the Future

Schools haven’t changed much in the last hundred years but as more schools embrace digital tools in the classroom, the traditional school building is likely to change. Today’s public radio story examines what the school of the future might look like. And designers are predicting that more flexible school spaces will cost less money to build.

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August 28, 2014

5:30

Border.square

Border Fence Along US-Mexico Border

Immigration between Mexico and the United States is a hot button political issue. Much of the focus is on the border fence separating the two countries. Pedestrian Fence 225, brought 18 foot high walls separating Texas border towns from Mexico and along with it a lot of controversy. In today’s public radio story we hear opinions about the wall from local homeowners, politicians and border patrol agents.

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August 27, 2014

4:42

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Getting It Fast: The Instant Economy

Sometimes you want what you want when you want it, and you will pay to get it quickly. This desire combined with smart phone and GPS technology has created a booming market of services that enable their users to get what they want, when they want it. The instant gratification these services enable has created an “Instant gratification economy” that changes the way people interact with the world and the way people work. Listen to learn more about these services and their impact.

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August 26, 2014

2:51

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International Response to Ebola

The Ebola outbreak in West Africa has been made more difficult by the lack of trained medical volunteers willing to help care for patients. In today’s public radio story we hear from a US medical specialist in infectious disease who bucked this trend and went to Sierra Leone to care for Ebola patients despite the risks. Listen to learn more about what compelled her to go and what she is doing to protect herself.

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August 25, 2014

4:33

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The Giver: A World Without War or Memories

In 1993, the book The Giver made a splash in the world of young literature, 20 years later it has made it to the big screen. Author Lois Lowry discusses her inspirations for a world in which there are no memories or emotions but there are clear rules and regulations. We also hear from the movie’s screenwriter, who himself read the book as a fifth grader. Listen to this public radio story to learn more about what inspired the book and led to the film.

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August 22, 2014

3:41

Stadium.squared

Chicago Little League Team Makes History

The Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pennsylvania is coming to its end with the championship games this weekend. One team from Chicago, Jackie Robinson West, is making history as the first all-black team to make it to the Little League World Series in 31 years. In this radio story, we will hear from the Chicago community that is supporting them. Listen to learn more about this historic team and the impact their success might have on baseball.

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