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February 10, 2020

:26

Stuffed bear

Weird News: Stuffed Animal Lost for 14 Years

Listen to this story about an 18-year-old girl who discovers her long-lost stuffed animal that was missing for 14 years.

Vocabulary: intact

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February 10, 2020

5:01

Acquittal

President Donald Trump Is Acquitted in Impeachment Trial

The Senate voted to acquit President Trump of charges of abuse of power and obstruction of Congress. The House of Representatives had impeached the president on these violations in December, but the Senate’s decision means he will not be removed from office. Senators cast votes along party lines, with the exception of Senator Mitt Romney of Utah, who was the first senator to vote to convict a president in his own party. Listen to hear how Romney came to his decision and how Congress plans to move forward after an exhausting and divisive impeachment trial.

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February 7, 2020

3:40

Textbook

Debate: Should Everyone Use the Same Textbooks?

Students around the country may learn different versions of U.S. history depending on where they live. Textbook publishers often customize textbooks for different states in response to political pressure, covering specific topics differently. Some say that this is important because different regions have different populations and different priorities. Others believe that all students in the country should have access to the same information and that variations in textbook content contributes to deepening the political divide. Listen to hear more about how textbooks differ from state to state and then debate: Should everyone use the same textbooks?

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February 6, 2020

4:25

Awkwafina

Asian Americans in Film

More Hollywood films featuring Asian Americans are being made, with some hitting it big at the box office. According to one producer, the trend signals a change in the way Asian Americans are perceived and accepted by mainstream culture. Listen to hear a YouTube channel producer explain how digital media helps minority artists break through, and what the success of Awkwafina means for other Asian American performers.

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February 5, 2020

4:27

Black labrador

Counting Dog Years

Scientists have developed a new, more accurate way to count a dog’s age in human years. Until now, people have generally believed that one year in a dog’s life equals seven years of human life. But when scientists compared chemical marks on dog and human DNA to see where they matched, they found surprising results about the relationship between dog and human ages. Listen to hear a scientist explain how the new technique works and what the research on canine aging means for dogs and their human friends.

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February 4, 2020

3:35

Immigrant

Impact of Anti-Immigrant Rhetoric on Hispanic Kids

A new study finds that Latino youth face higher rates of depression than their black and white peers. The results reflect a range of problems Latinos in America are facing, including discrimination, violence, and for some, fear of deportation. Listen to hear a Latina teen explain how hateful words affect her and what she is doing to combat her sadness and anger.

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February 3, 2020

3:54

Prayer2

Prayer in School

President Trump is taking steps to remind students and teachers of their right to pray in school. Under the Constitution, students have a right to freely practice their religion. However, the Constitution also says that public schools may not promote any religion. Listen to learn which religious expressions are allowed in public schools and how the law aims to prevent discrimination on the basis of religion.

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February 3, 2020

:27

Police car

Weird News: Beekeeper Police Unit

Listen to learn about the special beekeeping unit of the New York Police Department.

Vocabulary: deployed, expertise, extract

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January 31, 2020

4:58

Voting booth

Debate: Should Former Felons Be Allowed to Vote?

Felons in Mississippi often permanently lose their right to vote, even after serving their sentence. The practice has resulted in the disenfranchisement of 10% of the state’s population. Now, civil rights groups are challenging the law in court, claiming it discriminates against black citizens and amounts to cruel and unusual punishment. Those in favor of the law say although it was originally passed to suppress the black vote post-Reconstruction, there is no evidence of racial bias today. Listen to learn more about the lawsuit against the state of Mississippi and then debate: Should former felons be allowed to vote?

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January 30, 2020

3:59

Harry meghan1

Harry and Meghan Leave Royalty Behind

Britain’s Prince Harry and his wife, Meghan Markle, have agreed to stop using their royal titles and give up their official duties in order to have more freedom to live their lives on their own terms. The couple is seeking more independence than the queen will allow and therefore leaving their official roles as senior members of the royal family. Listen to hear more about the terms of this unusual break in royal tradition and learn how the British public is responding.

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January 29, 2020

3:51

Planet2

Teen Discovers New Planet

A high school senior interning at NASA has discovered a new planet. The young scientist was monitoring a telescope when he picked up clues that an unidentified object was circling. He alerted senior scientists who confirmed the object was a planet. Listen to hear a teen researcher describe the new planet and how he managed to find it on his third day on the job.

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January 28, 2020

6:54

Little women   frontispiece cropped

"Little Women" Remains Relevant

In a new movie version of Little Women, based on the classic novel by Louisa May Alcott, actress Saoirse Ronan plays the independent, rebellious Jo March. Little Women depicts the lives of four sisters and their mother, Marmee, as they struggle to survive while their father is off fighting in the Civil War. Ronan explains how the economic constraints on women at the time shaped the sisters’ life choices. Listen to hear more about the making of Little Women and why the lead actress believes the story remains relevant today.

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January 27, 2020

4:26

Washington constitutional convention 1787

High Crimes and Misdemeanors in Impeachment

The impeachment of President Donald J. Trump has focused the nation’s attention on a short section of the U.S. Constitution. Along with treason and bribery, the Constitution says presidents may be removed from office for “high crimes and misdemeanors,” but what exactly the phrase means is open for discussion. Listen to hear an expert explain where the phrase “high crimes and misdemeanors” came from, why the framers decided to include it, and how it has sparked exactly the kind of debate the framers anticipated.

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January 27, 2020

:27

Fish

Weird News: Boy Lassos Big Fish

Listen to hear about a young boy who caught a six-foot fish with a lasso.

Vocabulary: exaggerate

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January 24, 2020

3:46

Drone

Debate: Should Drones Be Used to Deliver Packages?

Unmanned drones are already being used for photography, inspections, and other local projects, but now companies plan to launch them on longer trips to neighborhoods, homes, and health clinics. Some say drones can save lives by delivering medicines and organs for transplant to clinics and reaching people in rural areas with limited access to healthcare. But drones bring added noise to neighborhoods and could cause injuries. Listen to learn more about the pros and cons of drone delivery and then debate: Should drones be used to deliver packages?

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January 23, 2020

3:43

Monument ave robert e. lee

Rumors of War Sculpture

A striking sculpture by artist Kehinde Wiley is moving to a Virginia street alongside several statues honoring Confederate war heroes. Wiley’s sculpture is called “Rumors of War” and features an African-American boy on a horse wearing a hoodie. It is meant to challenge how the Civil War and its aftermath are memorialized on the street and throughout the country. Listen to learn more about the sculpture and to hear a professor explain why it is sure to spark conversation about how we remember the past.

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January 22, 2020

2:24

Cosmic crisp

New Cosmic Crisp Apple

A crunchy new apple has hit supermarket shelves. A cross between Honeycrisp and Enterprise varieties, the new Cosmic Crisp apple is the result of years of genetic cross-breeding by plant scientists at Washington State University. Listen to hear the lead scientist describe the mouth-watering qualities of the new variety, and why she hopes it is a hit with consumers.

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January 21, 2020

2:21

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Protests in Iran

Iranians took to the streets in angry protest after government leaders admitted to accidentally shooting down a Ukrainian passenger jet, killing everyone aboard. The protest came just days after Iranian citizens had gathered on the streets to condemn the killing of their beloved general, Soleimani, by the Americans. Listen to hear why protesters are angry with their supreme leader and how the government is responding to the unrest.

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January 20, 2020

:26

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Weird News: Penny Pyramid

Listen to hear about a man who built a pyramid out of pennies.

Vocabulary: demolish, unconventional

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January 17, 2020

3:38

Test 986769 640

Debate: Should College Admissions Use the SAT and ACT Tests?

Students sued the University of California to force it to stop requiring applicants to submit standardized test scores. The complaint claims tests like the SAT and ACT are biased against low-income and non-white applicants, and scores are closely linked to family income. Defenders of the tests say they are the most objective way to evaluate skills and point to other countries that rely heavily on testing while producing high-achieving students. Listen to hear more about the lawsuit and then debate: Should college admissions use the SAT and ACT tests?

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January 16, 2020

4:17

112319cadream2

Lending Circles Boost Credit

When someone borrows money and pays it back on time, they build credit, and good credit allows them to borrow more. People without a good credit history are often blocked from important economic transactions like renting an apartment or buying a car. Low-income people, immigrants, and others often have trouble getting their first loan to build a good credit history. Lending circles offer a community-based solution by arranging for people to borrow from each other. Listen to hear participants explain how lending circles work and how the loans they receive can improve their lives.

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January 15, 2020

3:56

Antarctic2

Rowing to Antarctica

The first person to ever cross the Antarctic alone decided to attempt another dangerous, icy expedition. Colin O’Brady wanted to row from South America to Antarctica with a team of daring travelers. Although he had never rowed before he decided to take this journey, he made sure to prepare himself both mentally and physically for the challenging trip. Listen to learn what motivated O’Brady to go on this thrilling expedition and find out what he needed to do to prepare for it.

Update: Since this story first aired, O’Brady’s team successfully completed the journey across the Drake Passage.

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January 14, 2020

3:22

Aussie wildfires

Wildfires in Australia

Wildfires are raging in Australia, threatening human and animal life. As the climate warms and rainfall and humidity decrease, large parts of the land have become dry and brittle – ideal conditions for fires to start suddenly and spread quickly. Listen to hear how intense heat and smoke are affecting daily life and what residents are doing to stay cool when temperatures reach 120 degrees Fahrenheit.

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January 13, 2020

3:55

Qasem soleim funeral tehran 8

Iranians React at General's Funeral

The United States launched an airstrike that killed Iranian General Qassem Soleimani, and Iranians responded with grief and anger. Soleimani was Iran’s most powerful general and a beloved national hero. He had organized deadly attacks on Americans over many years, prompting the strike. Listen to hear how mourners at Soleimani’s funeral, including his daughter, expressed their rage and sadness, and how they want Iran’s military to respond.

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January 13, 2020

:26

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Weird News: The Fantastic Grandmothers

Listen to hear how a group of "fantastic grandmothers" are helping researchers study sea snakes.

Vocabulary: citizen scientist, venomous

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January 10, 2020

4:34

Logging3

Debate: Should Wood Be Considered Renewable Energy?

Renewable resources are said to provide “clean” energy that does not harm the planet. Some say wood is renewable, arguing that trees can be replanted, and that the carbon dioxide released by burning wood is eventually reabsorbed by the new trees, making them “carbon neutral.” Others dispute the math used to calculate carbon neutrality since it takes so many years to regrow a forest. Listen to hear why the U.S. is sending millions of tons of wood pellets to Europe for burning and then debate: Should wood be considered renewable energy?

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January 9, 2020

4:20

Autism2 %281%29

Inclusive Programs Support Students with Autism

Gifted autistic teens can have trouble finding summer programs that push them academically while also supporting their particular social needs. The University of Iowa’s College of Education summer program welcomes teens with autism spectrum disorder and provides the social and academic supports necessary for students to explore advanced subjects in math, science, and the arts. Listen to hear teens with autism spectrum disorder describe their experiences and how this unique summer program has made a difference in their lives.

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January 8, 2020

2:20

Cat

Lost Cat Found 1300 Miles Away

A man recently received a shocking phone call: a shelter had found his beloved lost cat, Sasha. Five years had passed since Sasha’s owners had last seen him, and Sasha was over a thousand miles from his home in Portland. No one is quite sure how, but Sasha made his way from Portland, Oregon to Santa Fe, New Mexico safely and survived without his owners for all that time. Listen to learn more about Sasha’s story and find out what happened when he returned home.

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January 7, 2020

4:47

Food waste plate

Generating Electricity from Food Waste

Extra food thrown into landfills produces harmful methane gas as it rots, contributing to global warming. Farmers in Massachusetts are combating the problem by converting gas from food waste into something useful: electricity. The results have helped to power thousands of homes. Listen to hear a farmer describe how he makes electricity from discarded food and why he calls the process a “home run.”

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January 6, 2020

:26

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Weird News: Rats Driving Cars

Listen and learn how researchers have taught lab rats how to drive cars.

Vocabulary: navigate, maneuver, extraordinary

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January 6, 2020

3:53

Emmett till single

Protecting the Emmett Till Memorial

A Mississippi memorial to a teenage boy murdered on the banks of the Tallahatchie River has been rededicated for the fourth time. Emmett Till was an African American boy from Chicago visiting his Southern relatives when he was kidnapped and killed by two white men. Images from the horrific act helped to start the Civil Rights movement. Since the 1955 killing, three memorials have been installed to honor Emmett Till, but all have been vandalized. Listen to hear the director of the Emmett Till Memorial Commission explain why the group decided to put up a fourth marker and how it will be protected.

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January 3, 2020

2:02

Hotdogs

Using the Scientific Method to Win a Hot Dog Toss

It’s official: A team of students from MIT can toss a hotdog farther than anyone else in the world. The young scientists recently beat the existing Guinness world record in the hotdog throw, a title once held by an NFL quarterback. To prepare for competition, the group systematically tested different throwing techniques, cooking methods, and types of wieners. Listen to hear a STEM student explain what motivated her to take on the challenge and how her team’s scientific approach helped lead them to victory.

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January 2, 2020

1:46

Goose2

Unlikely Animal Friends

A Pennsylvania animal shelter put up a horse and a goose for adoption – together. That is because, as best friends, the members of this unlikely duo cannot bear to be apart. Listen to hear a surprising story of friendship between two animals from different species and learn how their bond developed.

UPDATE: Since this story first aired, the pair has been adopted.

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December 30, 2019

:27

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Weird News: Dog Runs for Governor

Listen to hear what happened when a man signed up his dog to run for Governor of Kansas.

Vocabulary: qualifications, disqualify

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December 26, 2019

7:32

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President Donald Trump is Impeached by the House

President Donald J. Trump was impeached by the House of Representatives in December 2019 for high crimes and misdemeanors. The first article of impeachment charges the president with abuse of power, and the second with obstruction of Congress. Trump is the third president in the history of the United States to be impeached. In a deeply divided Congress, the voting was split along party lines, with almost all Democrats voting to impeach and all Republicans voting against impeachment. The articles of impeachment now go to the Senate, where a trial will be held to determine whether or not to remove President Trump from office. Listen to learn about the historic impeachment.

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December 23, 2019

:26

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Weird News: Eagles Adopt a Hawk

Listen and learn about a family of eagles who adopted a baby hawk.

Vocabulary: avid, observe

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December 20, 2019

5:29

Dna %282%29

Debate: Should Police Have Access to Genetic Data?

People who mail their DNA to a genetic testing company typically do not imagine that their data will be viewed by the police. But law enforcement finds genetic databases useful in solving crimes and has asked the courts to give them better access to people’s genetic information. Citizens worry that the data they thought would be kept private will be used without their consent. Listen to hear a legal expert discuss the benefits and risks of sharing information with law enforcement and then debate: should police have access to genetic data?

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December 19, 2019

3:44

First gen 2

Support for First Generation College Students

Students who are the first in their families to attend college face unique challenges. They often feel like outsiders, unfamiliar with common campus practices like “office hours” and unsure how to navigate college life. Their sense of isolation leads many “first-gen” students to drop out of college. One small private college is taking steps to help these vulnerable students adjust to campus life and graduate on time. Listen to learn how role-playing, free lunches, and a list of first-gen employees on campus help first-gen college students succeed.

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December 18, 2019

4:06

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"Mudlarks" Seek Buried Treasure

Many years ago, poor children known as “mudlarks” used to dig through garbage along the Thames River in London. One modern English woman has been mudlarking for years, but for a very different reason: she searches for ancient relics of everyday life in years past. It is dirty work, but rewarding. She has discovered all sorts of artifacts from periods throughout history. Listen to hear a modern mudlark describe the excitement of digging for buried treasure and what she has uncovered in the process.

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December 17, 2019

2:06

Electric eel

Electric Eel Lights Christmas Tree

An electric eel is lighting up a Christmas tree at the Tennessee Aquarium in Chattanooga. The eel, named Miguel Wattson, emits pulses of electricity that cause the lights to flicker and blink. Visitors are delighted, and the aquarium hopes they gain a new appreciation for the species. Listen to learn how Miguel’s meals affect the brightness of the tree lights and what his Twitter followers are seeing.

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