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April 24, 2019

4:14

San francisco aerial

Flying Cars

If Uber and other transportation technology companies have their way, people who use ride-hailing apps will soon be able to order flying taxis. These futuristic vehicles would quickly transport passengers from location to location, traveling high above traffic on the ground. Listen to find out how and when the dream of flying cars may become a reality, and what issues need to be considered before then.

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April 23, 2019

5:11

Holocaust museum

Predicting Genocide

Historically, genocides follow predictable patterns. The U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum has established the Early Warning Project to investigate warning signs of mass killings, or genocide, to inform policymakers where such atrocities seem likely. Genocide Watch is another organization that aims to predict and prevent genocide. Listen to this story to learn about how these groups track data about conditions that may precede genocide and what they have learned from their research.

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April 22, 2019

4:38

Netanyahu

Prospects for a Two-State Solution in Israel

In a very close race, Benjamin Netanyahu was elected to his fourth consecutive term (and fifth overall) as prime minister of Israel. Since he was first elected in 1996, Netanyahu has taken different positions on the issue of trying to establish a separate Palestinian state, known as a “two-state solution.” Listen to this interview with a former U.S. ambassador to Israel to learn more about the history of this proposal for resolving the ongoing Israeli-Palestinian conflict.

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April 19, 2019

4:23

Bladensburg cross

Debate: Can public memorials include religious imagery?

The United States Supreme Court recently faced a case that tested the idea of “separation of church and state” that is a core tenet of American democracy. The case considered whether a giant memorial cross on public land might be unconstitutional. The justices heard a variety of arguments for and against the use of religious imagery in a public memorial. Listen to hear some of those arguments and debate: Can public memorials include religious imagery?

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April 18, 2019

2:55

Onion cells

Modifying Plant DNA with a Nano-Needle

Would you like to eat apples that never turn brown? Scientists hoping to genetically modify plants for crop development think they may have found a solution to a major problem they have been facing. The cell walls of plants make it difficult to insert genetic material into plant cells to change how those plant cells work. The solution–carbon nanotubes–was discovered by accident. Listen to learn about the discovery and implementation of this nanotechnology solution and how it could change the way scientists breed new crop varieties.

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April 17, 2019

2:15

Cute white lab

Running a Marathon Blind

A blind runner recently completed the New York City Half Marathon with his guide dogs. He has run many marathons with human guides, but completing this race was an important accomplishment for all involved. Listen to this story to learn about this courageous runner and his helpful dogs and find out what he hopes to do next.

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April 16, 2019

3:16

Grand canyon

Grand Canyon Love Notes

The Grand Canyon National Park recently celebrated its 100th birthday. A park ranger there created a “pop-up project,” placing an old typewriter on an overlook more than six miles into the canyon and inviting people to write notes reflecting on the moment. Listen to learn what inspired the project and hear some of the writing that hikers left behind.

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April 15, 2019

3:56

Muslim and proud

Anti-Muslim Violence Effects

Mental health professionals worry that the trauma of the recent terrorist attacks at New Zealand mosques is not healthy for young Muslims who face intolerance on a daily basis. Muslim teens face racism and prejudice in their everyday lives, especially growing up in the era of the wars in Iraq and Afghanistan. Listen to this story to learn about students’ experiences growing up Muslim in the U.S. today and what people are doing to support healthy identity development.

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April 12, 2019

6:31

Womens team soccer

Debate: Should women's soccer players get equal pay?

The U.S. women’s national soccer team, which is the number one ranked team in the world, has filed a gender discrimination lawsuit against the U.S. Soccer Federation because the players on the women’s team are paid less than their counterparts on the U.S. men’s national team. Opponents argue that comparing the two national teams is not really possible because of differences between men’s and women’s soccer internationally. Listen to this story to hear more about the details of the case and Debate: Should U.S. national soccer team players all get equal pay?

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April 11, 2019

3:53

Bonnie and clyde

Bonnie & Clyde Poetry

Bonnie Parker and Clyde Barrow were notorious gangsters during the Great Depression. The Barrow gang robbed banks and stores, led prison breaks, engaged in gunfights, and were constantly on the run from the law until they died in a shootout in their 20s. Surprisingly, Bonnie and Clyde also wrote poetry, and their original poems were recently put up for auction, along with some photographs. Listen to hear excerpts of their poetry and reflections on what it reveals about the legendary criminals.

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April 10, 2019

3:12

Chimpanzee families

Research on Primate Sharing

Scientists are curious about how humans evolved to help each other, which is different from the typical behavior of other animals. To investigate social behaviors such as helping and sharing, researchers have performed experiments to see how willing other primates are to share food and supplies. Listen to learn about their research on how other primates approach sharing and how that differs from human behavior.

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April 9, 2019

3:47

Nokona gloves

The Last Baseball Glove Factory in America

In a small town in Texas, near cattle pastures and crop fields, is the Nokona baseball glove factory. The family-owned business is now the only baseball glove manufacturer left in the U.S. While Nokona gloves are not as well known as some other major brands, Nokona does have a respected and established position in the youth baseball market. Listen to hear more about the last baseball glove factory in the United States of America.

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April 8, 2019

5:38

Plastic garbage

Plastic Waste Has Nowhere to Go

For years, China bought plastic waste from the U.S. in great quantities, but they are no longer doing so. Now the U.S. must find alternatives to exporting plastic waste to China. Listen to this story to hear about why the recycling landscape has changed, what happens to the plastic that Americans throw away, and what can be done to address this mounting problem.

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April 5, 2019

2:52

Mom photographerer

Debate: Should parents share about kids on social media?

For years, parents have commemorated major moments in their children’s lives with a camera. These personal photos and videos often end up on social media, shared with wide audiences. Some kids like this exposure, while others do not. Listen to this story to hear a reporter with The Atlantic magazine talk about this social media phenomenon and then debate: Should parents share about their kids on social media?

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April 4, 2019

2:46

Seuss books

Remembering Dr. Seuss and How He Grew

Dr. Seuss is well known for his popular children’s books full of fanciful rhymes and whimsical illustrations. His earlier cartoons, however, include many racist and anti-Semitic images, which the artist later regretted. Listen to this commentary by another children’s book author and illustrator who reflects on the importance of explaining Dr. Seuss’s evolution as an artist and a person in an exhibit of his work at the Dr. Seuss Museum.

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April 3, 2019

2:31

Near pebble beach

Teen Diver Discovers Rotting Golf Balls

When a young diver found thousands of golf balls underwater, she decided to collect them and ask a scientist about the risks they might pose to the marine environment. They began investigating the situation together. Listen to find out what they learned and why the diver thinks “people would be shocked.”

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April 2, 2019

3:56

Eric reid

Football Protesters Settle with NFL

Colin Kaepernick and Eric Reid, the first two NFL players to kneel on the field during the national anthem to protest racial injustice, have reached a settlement with the NFL. Kaepernick and Reid alleged that NFL teams were working together to keep them out of the league and filed grievances with the NFL. Listen to hear from a sports writer about what the players may have won in the settlement and what impact their actions have had.

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April 1, 2019

5:08

Department of justice

Mueller Report Findings

Special counsel Robert Mueller led a two-year investigation into Russain interference in the 2016 U.S. elections. The inquiry has ended, and the team’s report has been submitted to the federal Justice Department. Although the full report has not been released to the public yet, a summary of its conclusions has been shared. Listen to this story to learn about the questions that framed the investigation and what the Mueller team found.

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March 29, 2019

3:49

Female gi

Debate: Should women be drafted?

The U.S. military is an all-volunteer force. However, when American men turn 18, they are required to register with the Selective Service, which means they are eligible to be drafted to serve in the military if the U.S. goes to war and needs more soldiers than the all-volunteer military force can provide. Recently, a federal judge ruled that requirement should not be limited to men in response to a lawsuit arguing that restriction was unconstitutional. Listen to hear different views about whether the U.S. should require both men and women to register with Selective Service and debate: Should women be drafted?

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March 28, 2019

4:03

Yale university

College Students on Fair Admissions

A recent scandal has exposed multiple cases of bribery and fraud in college admissions. A number of wealthy parents paid to falsify test scores and applications and bribe coaches to get their children admitted to competitive colleges. While these actions are clearly illegal, there are other ways in which privileged students have been able to influence the college admissions process that feel unfair to students who have had to earn their place without those advantages. Listen to hear college students talk about their reactions to the scandal and their views about inequities in the college admissions process.

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March 27, 2019

1:45

Gavin newsom

No More Death Penalty in California

Governor Gavin Newsom of California has issued a suspension of capital punishment in his state. While it has been years since a death row inmate was executed in California, voters have rejected proposoals to abolish the death penalty on recent ballot measures. Critics of the governor say that his action betrays the will of California residents. Newsom says that this decision to end the death penalty is the right one. Listen to hear the governor’s rationale and why this decision has many people talking.

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March 26, 2019

3:33

Family outside shelter

Homeless in Middle School

Millions of American children do not have a home. When families are not able to afford housing, some live in homeless shelters, but there are many hardships facing students in those circumstances. Listen to this interview with an Idaho teenager and his grandmother about their experience of homelessness, how it has affected them, and how they find support in handling their daily challenges.

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March 25, 2019

3:55

No to white supremacy

White Nationalist Terrorism

The recent massacre of worshippers at two mosques in New Zealand was perpetrated by a white nationalist extremist. A counterterrorism expert draws parallels between these right wing extremists and Islamic extremists, explaining how the growing international network of right wing extremists has been engaging in practices that mirror those of al-Qaeda, ISIS, and other Islamic extremist groups. Listen to hear about why this former FBI agent believes that more attention must be paid to white nationalist terrorism and the threat it poses worldwide.

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March 22, 2019

4:53

Dna electron microscope

Debate: Should three-parent babies be allowed?

A clinic in Kiev, Ukraine is offering a controversial experimental procedure that allows parents experiencing infertility to have babies with three genetic parents. While this type of genetic engineering is allowed in some countries, it has been banned in the U.S., as there are many concerns in the medical community about the procedure’s safety and its ethical implications. Listen to this interview with the mother of one of a handful of three-parent babies that have been born and debate: Should three-parent babies be allowed?

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March 21, 2019

4:27

Dog sledding

‘Ugly Dogs’ Follow the Iditarod Race

The world famous Iditarod Trail Sled Dog Race takes place annually in March. Sled dog teams and their human mushers travel 938 miles through the Alaskan wilderness. This year’s competitors include a rookie team led by musher Blair Braverman, whose large fan base is known as the “ugly dogs.” Listen to this interview with Braverman to learn about some of the stars of her sled dog team, their preparations for the race, and how the “ugly dogs” got their name.

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March 20, 2019

5:59

Pop warner football

The Inequity of School Football

North American football has become well known to many people as a sport with serious injury risks. This growing awareness of the dangers of football has led to a general decrease in participation, but not for people from low socioeconomic backgrounds. A recent report suggests that the rate of participation for low-income children is on the rise. One reason that low-income children continue to play football may be the possibility of opportunity offered by the popular sport. Listen to hear more about this increasing participation gap, the reasons for it, and the implications for children and society at large.

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March 19, 2019

3:58

Black robotics barbie

Barbie's Inspiring Women Series

Mattel’s world famous “Barbie” doll turns 60 this year. The toy company that first released the popular doll in 1959 has introduced a line of Barbie dolls designed to honor accomplished women from around the world. The dolls are intended to inspire girls by honoring role models whose accomplishments represent a variety of fields. However, the dolls do not fully resemble the women they are designed to honor. Listen to this conversation between two journalists about whether these role model Barbies are as empowering to girls as they could be.

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March 18, 2019

4:23

The beach wall

Seizing Land for Government Use

The recently proposed wall on the U.S.-Mexican border would not be the first of its kind. In 2006, Democrats and Republicans passed a bill to construct a secure fence across part of the border. To build the fence, the government took land from private property owners, which is allowed through a power known as eminent domain. In such cases, the government is not required to ask owners for permission to claim their land. Listen to hear about the laws that allow this kind of land seizure, how they impact landowners, and how issues related to eminent domain might resurface with the current border wall proposal.

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March 15, 2019

4:10

Senator elizabeth warren

Debate: Should tribal citizenship define Native American identity?

What identifies a person as Native American? Is it tribal citizenship? Is it ancestry? If so, how much? The fact that Senator Elizabeth Warren registered as “American Indian” with the State Bar of Texas in 1986 has generated public discussion about who can call themselves Native American. The U.S. census indicates significant growth in the number of people identified as Native American over the last sixty years, estimated at 2% of Americans in 2010. Listen to this story to learn about the complexities associated with identifying as Native American, and then debate: Should tribal citizenship define Native American identity?

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March 14, 2019

5:53

Michelle obama

Michelle Obama on Becoming

Michelle Obama, whose marriage to President Barack Obama brought her into the national spotlight, has written a memoir titled Becoming. In the book, she tells the story of her journey from childhood to the White House and beyond, sharing reflections on challenges she faced along the way and on how she has forged her identity over the course of her life. Listen to this story to hear some of Obama’s insights into her experience of becoming who she is today.

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March 13, 2019

4:31

Big supernova

Earth's Greatest Threats

An astronomy writer has written a new book about “hazards to life in our universe,” in which he describes exploding stars, nuclear meltdowns, viral epidemics, natural disasters, and other phenomena with potentially cataclysmic impact on earth. Listen to this interview with the book’s author to hear what he learned from his research about past, present, and future threats to life on earth.

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March 12, 2019

4:46

Gloria and joann little egypt residents

Historic African American Neighborhood Remembered

Freedmen’s communities were started by newly freed slaves following the Civil War. One such community was ‘Little Egypt’ in Dallas, Texas. The neighborhood got its name from a nearby church that is still open today, though in a different location. By the 1960s, many community residents had been bought out, and Little Egypt became part of Lake Highlands, a major suburb of Dallas. Listen to this story to hear what it was like to live in Little Egypt in years past and learn about how historians at Richland university uncovered the buried history of a southern freedmen’s community.

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March 11, 2019

7:39

Unite the right rally

Antisemitism Today

A deadly shooting at a Pittsburgh synagogue, neo-Nazi demonstrations, and other recent events have brought national attention to the issue of anti-Semitism in contemporary America. Recent comments by a new member of Congress have generated debate about what constitutes anti-Semitism and spurred the U.S. House of Representatives to pass a resolution condemning “hateful expressions of intolerance.” Listen to this interview with a Jewish scholar and author who reflects on anti-Semitism in America today.

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March 8, 2019

4:53

Housing development not the projects

Debate: Is Pluralism Still an American Ideal?

The motto of the United States of America, “E Pluribus Unum,” meaning “Out of Many, One,” represents an ideal as old as the nation. A recent study investigated how people currently feel about living in a pluralistic society, side-by-side with those who are different from them. The study found that large numbers of Americans reported having little contact with people of different religions, races, or political beliefs. Listen to a reporter involved in the study discuss the poll results and then debate: Is pluralism still an American ideal?

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March 7, 2019

4:22

Captain marvel

Captain Marvel: Marvel's First Female Led Film

The Marvel Cinematic Universe is starting off big in 2019 with Captain Marvel. The film, which features a superheroine battling evil, is the first ever movie in the Marvel Universe with a female lead. In order to do the character and story justice, Marvel hired not only a female director, but also female producers and writers. Geneva Robertson-Dworet is one of those writers, and her experience has shown her that opportunities are limited for female screenwriters. The film industry has been historically dominated by men, which has had an impact on how female characters have been portrayed. Listen to a Captain Marvel screenwriter describe her experience as a woman in the film industry.

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March 6, 2019

4:02

Sad salton place

Living in One of the Most Polluted Places in California

While living in California is often associated with beautiful beaches, mountains, and movie stars, millions of Californians actually live in areas with high levels of pollution in both the air and the soil. Imperial County is one of three areas in California that does not meet the federal standards for air quality. This pollution has caused major health issues for its mostly low-income residents. Some who moved there for opportunity now worry about the health of their children. Listen to a family that moved to Imperial County to pursue their own California dream discuss how living in a highly polluted environment has affected them.

This story was produced as part of the California Dream series.The California Dream series is a statewide media collaboration of CALmatters, KPBS, KPCC, KQED and Capital Public Radio with support from the Corporation for Public Broadcasting and the James Irvine Foundation.

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March 5, 2019

3:56

News reporter

Press Freedom Around the World

A journalist in the Philippines who has been critical of the government was recently arrested for the sixth time, raising concerns among champions of press freedom around the world. The arrest was based on false charges, and the journalist may be in danger in a country where the press has been regularly targeted by an authoritarian government. Listen to this interview with a representative of Reporters without Borders, an organization that reports on press freedom, about the risks facing journalists worldwide.

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March 4, 2019

4:09

Teeachers on strike

Teacher Strikes Share Common Cause

Teachers across the country have been striking this year, asking for support in the form of smaller class sizes, more school nurses and counselors, and pay raises. While their specific demands differ somewhat across school districts, there are common themes. In addition to asking for higher pay for the work that they do, teachers are asking for improvements that would better meet the needs of students. In some cases, they are protesting policies that they believe are not helping students. Listen to this story to learn more about the recent national trend of organized teacher protests.

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March 1, 2019

4:23

Getting a shot

Debate: Should teens control their own health care?

Most of those infected with measles during a recent outbreak in the Pacific Northwest were unvaccinated children. While doctors and public health officials strongly recommend vaccinations, some parents choose not to vaccinate their children. Parents’ wishes, however, may differ from those of their children. Listen to this interview with a high school student who decided to get vaccinated when he turned 18, against his mother’s wishes, and debate: Should teens control their own health care?

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February 28, 2019

6:33

Protest parkland on the stairs

Parkland Students: A Year in Activism

It has been one year since the deadly shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Florida. That shooting sparked a national movement led by survivors aimed at decreasing gun violence. The student activists who organized the March for Our Lives protests engaged people around the world in speaking out against gun violence and speaking up for policies to prevent it. Listen to this interview with a journalist who has written a book about the events and reflects on what the students have accomplished in the year since the shooting.

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